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Hi,
could somebody comment on the following examples? You know, which are ok, which might be more common, etc.

1) My car's engine is not very powerful.
2) My car engine is not very powerful.
3) The engine of my car is not very powerful.

I don't know why, but I don't like #2 much.
Thanks in advance. Emotion: smile
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Comments  
As far as I know, when it comes to inanimate objects you should rather use the construction presented in the 3rd example, that is "the... of..." -> the engine of my car.
As for people, and animate beings you should rather use the saxon genetive form i.e. like in the 1st example...

However, I guess that in todays' english, there're so many exceptions to the above rules that you can say 'my car's engine' in any case... But I think someone else will clarify that, just in case I'm wrong.

Best wishes,
KooyeenHi,
could somebody comment on the following examples? You know, which are ok, which might be more common, etc.

1) My car's engine is not very powerful.
2) My car engine is not very powerful. This just doesn't sound natural.
3) The engine of my car is not very powerful.

I don't know why, but I don't like #2 much.
Thanks in advance. Emotion: smile

Some would object to number 1, but I don't.
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Some would object to number 1, but I don't.

That's how I would say it!
Thanks! I understand perfectly Emotion: smile
I also find #1 the most natural, with #3 as my second choice. (I never even heard the rule abou the Saxon genitive being used only for animate nouns until I started reading this forum -- it's really not something most native speakers think about.)
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Likewise Khoff. Seems to be a rule that non-natives made up to make things harder for themselves!
Hi,

In everyday speech, I think you're likely to hear simply 'My car's not very powerful'. It's obvious that we are talking about the engine, (not eg the right rear door.Emotion: smile)

Generally speaking, your English will be much more natural if you avoid saying the obvious. Often, although not in this case, this involves eliminating repetition of words.

Best wishes, Clive
CliveHi,

In everyday speech, I think you're likely to hear simply 'My car's not very powerful'. It's obvious that we are talking about the engine, (not eg the right rear door.Emotion: smile)

Generally speaking, your English will be much more natural if you avoid saying the obvious. Often, although not in this case, this involves eliminating repetition of words.

Best wishes, Clive
That's a good (valuable) instruction for ESL learners. I think it is universal for other languages too.

Thanks,
Hoa Thai
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