As I wrote in the title of the postEmotion: smile
It's my first essayEmotion: smile

Title:POLISH AND AMERICAN TERTIARY EDUCATION
Similarities and Differences between Higher-Education Systems

Although both countries have very distinctive social, economical and geographic background, when it comes to tertiary education, there are evident affinities. Firstly, both education systems insure access to equal educational opportunity for every individual. Secondly, they are offering the same basic graduation levels: bachelor “licencjat”, master “magister” and PhD “doktor”. Thirdly, the duration of one’s study in both countries is approximately the same. Both systems have a lot in common; however it is not as relevant as differences between both of them.

One of the easiest examples of distinction between both tertiary education systems is the yearly academic schedule. Here, the polish norms are much stricter then those applied in USA. In America students begin the year late August or early September and they continue through May or June. In Poland, however, the academic year begins precisely on first October and continues up to 24th June. Both schedules vary also in terms. In America, universities usually have either two terms per academic year (semesters), three terms (trimesters) or four terms (quarters). Polish universities apply only one system of terms, one that divides an academic year into two semesters.

The next example can be noticed in the grading system. Most American universities tend to use letter grades, sometimes with their numerical equivalent. At the end of each term student receives grades, those are used to present his G.P.A. - Grade Point Average. The information about G.P.A. can be used by potential employers in the future. Whenever student receives an “F” (the lowest grade), it means that he will not receive credit points for the failed subject. Credit points are vital to receive a degree diploma in USA. Situation in Poland, however, looks much different. The grading system is based on numeric grades from “one” till “six”, where “one” is the lowest. To pass, one needs to receive at least “three”. On most of the polish universities there is officially ECTS system, but practically it is not been used. There is also no official average grade system but students like to compare their achievements, comparing their grades using easy mathematical equations.

Much more distinctive than examples mentioned above, is the matter of financing higher education institutions in both countries. Polish government universities can be subsided from government funds as well as from local self-governments' budgets. They can also receive donations. That goes the same for American universities. The only difference is that USA, one of the richest countries in the world, can spend much more on education system. Continuing, a huge number of American universities apply yearly fees. According to polish law, government universities cannot apply such a fee. That cuts down a huge source of income. The money from college fees can be used in many ways, upgrading existing student facilities, building new ones and many, many more. This is main reason of opening private universities in Poland, which have wider choice of financing and witch began to be very attractive to students, not only by more advanced facilities but also by very good level of teaching. Sometimes even better than the one, offered by public universities. Private universities apply fees; unfortunately most of ambitious student cannot afford it even though the fees are almost nothing comparing those in USA. Again comes up the economical factor of the country.

Considering the arguments mentioned above, it is fare to say that Polish Tertiary education system needs some years before it can be as good as American one. There should applied changes in financing, grading and credit-point systems, and organization matters. Tertiary education system in America seems to work very good on the first look. Hopefully, when nobody will try to look at it with a magnifying glass, he might see some dirt after all. There is no perfect solution on how to deal with education system.

----------------end---------------------

please free to give your opinion,
please spare me, I'm new hereEmotion: wink
constructive critic is welcome Emotion: big smile
any grammar mistakes ? ( I checked it with word first ofcourse )

Thanks in advance for your timeEmotion: smile
1 2
Hi Lukas,

Thank you very much for trying very hard. You properly spaced your sentences and paragraphs. Your spelling was very good. For the most part, your grammar was very good. Because you did a lot of preparatory work, it was relatively easy for me to go through your essay and suggest changes. You will see where I made changes by the brackets.

Let me know what you think.

MountainHiker

Title:POLISH AND AMERICAN TERTIARY EDUCATION
Similarities and Differences between Higher-Education Systems

Although both [Poland and the United States] have very distinctive social, economical and geographic background, when it comes to tertiary education, there are [many equivalents]. First[], both education[al] systems [e]nsure access to equal educational opportunity for every individual. Second[], [both countries] offer[] the same basic graduation levels: bachelor “licencjat”, master “magister” and PhD “doktor”. Third[], the duration of [a student’s] study in both countries is approximately the same. Both systems have a lot in common; however[,] it is not as relevant as differences between both of them.

One of the easiest examples of distinction between both tertiary education systems is the yearly academic schedule. Here, the [P]olish norms are much stricter th[a]n those applied in USA. In America students begin the year late August or early September and they continue through May or June. In Poland, however, the academic year begins precisely on first October and continues up to 24th June. Both schedules vary also in terms. In America, universities usually have either two terms per academic year (semesters), three terms (trimesters) or four terms (quarters). Polish universities apply only one system of terms, one that divides an academic year into two semesters.

The next example can be noticed in the grading system. Most American universities tend to use letter grades, sometimes with their numerical equivalent. At the end of each term student receives grades, those are used to present his G.P.A. – Grade Point Average. The information about G.P.A. can be used by potential employers[]. Whenever [a] student receives an “F” (the lowest grade), it means that he will not receive credit points for the failed subject. Credit points are vital to receive a degree [] in USA. [The ] situation in Poland, however, looks much different. The grading system is based on numeric grades from one [to] six, where one is the lowest. To pass, one needs to receive at least a three. [For] most []Polish universities there is officially [an] ECTS system, but practically it is not been used. [Although] there is also no official average grade system, []students [can and do] compare their grades using easy mathematical equations. [there were many changes made to the last sentence]

Much more distinctive than examples mentioned above [] is the matter of financing higher education institutions in both countries. Polish government universities can be [subsidized] from government funds as well as from local self-governments' budgets. They can also receive donations. That goes the same for American universities. The only difference is that USA, one of the richest countries in the world, can spend much more on [its] education[al] system. Continuing, [most, if not all] American universities [charge annual tuitions]. According to polish law, government universities cannot apply such a fee. That [reduces] [a large] source of income. The money from college fees can be used in many ways, upgrading existing student facilities, building new ones and many, many more. This is main reason of opening private universities in Poland, which have wider choice of financing and w[h]ich began to be very attractive to students, not only by more advanced facilities but also by very good level of teaching.[You should rewrite the prior sentence. I am not sure it is a sentence at present.] Sometimes even better than the one, offered by public universities.[need to rewrite previous sentence] Private universities apply fees; unfortunately most of ambitious student cannot afford it even though the fees are almost nothing comparing those in USA.[1] Again comes up the economical factor of the country.[2]

Considering the arguments mentioned above, it is far to say that [the] Polish [t]ertiary education system needs some years before it [match the] American [system]. There should applied changes in financing, grading and credit-point systems, and organization matters. [need to rewrite prior sentence] [At first glance] the tertiary education[al] system in America seems to work very good. Hopefully, when nobody will try to look at it with a magnifying glass, he might see some dirt after all.[need to rewrite prior sentence] There is no perfect solution on how to deal with education[al] system.




Notes:

Here are some ideas.

1] Private universities apply fees; unfortunately most of ambitious student cannot afford it even though the fees are almost nothing comparing those in USA.[1]

Unfortunately the brightest and most ambitious students in Poland are unable to afford tuition fees at Poland’s private universities, even though the tuition in Poland is very modest compared to those in the U.S.

2] Again comes up the economical factor of the country.[2]

The economic factors, once again, play a key role.
Thank you @MountainHiker for spending time on my creationEmotion: smile

I use RP English in my essays, I forgot to mention it in the first place, I hope it's not a big problemEmotion: smile

1st paragraph:
"Although both [Poland and the United States] "- I used "countries" because the title has mentioned words "POLISH AND AMERICAN" - I thought it would be to many "national" words close to each other.

"many equivalents" - I used word "affinities" - why is that incorrect ? I used thesaurus for this word.

"First...Second...Third..." - I understand that this is better option. Why ?

"education[al] systems" - in general I have problem with this, I don't know really when I have to write, "educational" is an adjective here ? but then why "geographic background" ?

2nd paragraph:
here some stupid mistakes like then-thanEmotion: smile I will work on such mistakesEmotion: smile

3rd paragraph:
"Credit points are vital to receive a degree [] in USA" - there was word "diploma" erased, why can't I use it ? Doesn't it changes the meaning of the sentence?

I felt already from the begining that the last sentence was strange, but I couldn't find a sensible solution to it.

4th paragraph:
"subsidized" - I never wouldn't guess itEmotion: smile

"charge annual tuitions" - I couldn't find a better word for it than "yearly fees" , thanksEmotion: smile

"That [reduces] [a large] source of income" - I knew already that I used here too colloguial words, but nothing more camed to my mind

4th/5th paragraph:
[need to rewrite previous/prior sentence] - I will work on it tonight, I had already bad feeling about the endEmotion: smile

Your two ideas are great! May I use them in my work ?

Once again, thank you for your time!

ps. I will post the changes today, I get on them right awayEmotion: smile

EDIT:

1st changed sentence :

"Sometimes even better than the one, offered by public universities" changed to

"Sometimes even better than level of public universities"

2nd changed sentence:

"This is main reason of opening private universities in Poland, which have wider choice of financing and which begin to be very attractive to students, not only by more advanced facilities but also by very good level of teaching."

"This is main reason of opening private universities in Poland. It gives wider choice of financing and is very attractive to students, not only by more advanced facilities but also by very good level of teaching."

3rd changed sentence:

"There should applied changes in financing, grading and credit-point systems, and organization matters."

"There should be applied changes in financing, grading and credit-point systems and organization matters."
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Lukas,

So many questions!! Lol

Let's see if we can answer some of them--no promises though.

You: I use RP English in my essays, I forgot to mention it in the first place, I hope it's not a big problemEmotion: smile

Me: I don't know what RP English is, so no matter.

You: 1st paragraph:
"Although both [Poland and the United States] "- I used "countries" because the title has mentioned words "POLISH AND AMERICAN" - I thought it would be to many "national" words close to each other.

Me: Yeah, but now we are reading your essay. I like to pretend that the title didn't exist so that the essay stands on its own two feet.

You: "many equivalents" - I used word "affinities" - why is that incorrect ? I used thesaurus for this word.

In my thesaurus, the word "affinity" is not given as a synonym for "equivalent". I just know affinity doesn't sound right in that sentence.

You: "First...Second...Third..." - I understand that this is better option. Why ?

Me: Firstly, Secondly etc. sounds odd TO ME. This is not a hard and fast rule.

Look here: http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/adverbs.htm

You: "education[al] systems" - in general I have problem with this, I don't know really when I have to write, "educational" is an adjective here ? but then why "geographic background" ?

Me: Yes, it was meant to be an adjective. But on further reflection, maybe it is better just as education, a noun. Go through your essay and make the appropriate changes.

You: 3rd paragraph:
"Credit points are vital to receive a degree [] in USA" - there was word "diploma" erased, why can't I use it ? Doesn't it changes the meaning of the sentence?

Me: I think you were talking about universities? Universities grant degrees, and technicall schools give diplomas in North America. At least that is the general rule. "degree diploma" seems odd. "degrees or diplomas" is better.

You: I felt already from the begining that the last sentence was strange, but I couldn't find a sensible solution to it.

Me: I am not sure where you are. Often sleeping on a problem helps.

You: 4th paragraph:
"subsidized" - I never wouldn't guess itEmotion: smile

Me: Yeah, it's a toughie.

You: "charge annual tuitions" - I couldn't find a better word for it than "yearly fees" , thanksEmotion: smile

Me: No problem.

You: "That [reduces] [a large] source of income" - I knew already that I used here too colloguial words, but nothing more camed to my mind

Me: Hope it helps.

You: 4th/5th paragraph:
[need to rewrite previous/prior sentence] - I will work on it tonight, I had already bad feeling about the endEmotion: smile

Me: Yes, sleep often does wonders.

You: Your two ideas are great! May I use them in my work ?

Me: Sure, of course. I gave those two sentences as demonstrations. But you are more than welcome to use them.

On this note, a book I highly recommend is the following:
Style : Toward Clarity and Grace (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)
by Joseph M. Williams

http://snipurl.com/9254

You: Once again, thank you for your time!

Me: Helping you was a pleasure because you did so much preparatory work.


You:

1st changed sentence :

"Sometimes even better than the one, offered by public universities" changed to

"Sometimes even better than level of public universities"

2nd changed sentence:

"This is main reason of opening private universities in Poland, which have wider choice of financing and which begin to be very attractive to students, not only by more advanced facilities but also by very good level of teaching."

"This is main reason of opening private universities in Poland. It gives wider choice of financing and is very attractive to students, not only by more advanced facilities but also by very good level of teaching."

3rd changed sentence:

"There should applied changes in financing, grading and credit-point systems, and organization matters."

"There should be applied changes in financing, grading and credit-point systems and organization matters."


I encourage you to make ALL your changes and then post again.

I hope this helps.

MountainHiker
here it comes.....all changes are applied,
I have one book that we use on the lecture and tutorials titled: "Writing Better English"
ISBN: 90-6283-276-8, I think it was just released in The Netherlands.
RP English - Received Pronunciation, so called "BBC English" "official accent" of UK,
Now, I go to sleep now, with my head full of ideas for next essayEmotion: smile, will post it soon
If I missed something, I will write about it tomorrow, my brain doesn't work after 32 hours no sleeping periodEmotion: smile

title: POLISH AND AMERICAN TERTIARY EDUCATION
Similarities and Differences between Higher-Education Systems

Although both Poland and the United States have very distinctive social, economical and geographic backgrounds, when it comes to tertiary education, there are many equivalents. First, both educational systems ensure access to equal educational opportunity for every individual. Second, both countries offer the same basic graduation levels: bachelor “licencjat”, master “magister” and PhD “doktor”. Third, the duration of a student’s study in both countries is approximately the same. Both systems have a lot in common; however, it is not as relevant as differences between both of them.

One of the easiest examples of distinction between both tertiary education systems is the yearly academic schedule. Here, the Polish norms are much stricter than those applied in USA. In America students begin the year late August or early September and they continue through May or June. In Poland, however, the academic year begins precisely on first October and continues up to 24th June. Both schedules vary also in terms. In America, universities usually have either two terms per academic year (semesters), three terms (trimesters) or four terms (quarters). Polish universities apply only one system of terms, one that divides an academic year into two semesters.

The next example can be noticed in the grading system. Most American universities tend to use letter grades, sometimes with their numerical equivalent. At the end of each term student receives grades, those are used to present his G.P.A. - Grade Point Average. The information about G.P.A. can be used by potential employers. Whenever a student receives an “F” (the lowest grade), it means that he will not receive credit points for the failed subject. Credit points are vital to receive a degree in USA. The situation in Poland, however, looks much different. The grading system is based on numeric grades from “one” to “six”, where “one” is the lowest. To pass, one needs to receive at least “three”. For most Polish universities there is officially an ECTS system, but practically it is not been used. Although there is also no official average grade system, students can and do compare their grades using easy mathematical equations.

Much more distinctive than examples mentioned above is the matter of financing higher education institutions in both countries. Polish government universities can be subsidized from government funds as well as from local self-governments' budgets. They can also receive donations. That goes the same for American universities. The only difference is that USA, one of the richest countries in the world, can spend much more on its educational system. Continuing, most, if not all American universities charge annual tuitions. According to polish law, government universities cannot apply such a fee. That reduces a large source of income. The money from college fees can be used in many ways, upgrading existing student facilities, building new ones and many, many more. This is main reason of opening private universities in Poland. It gives wider choice of financing and is very attractive to students, not only by more advanced facilities but also by very good level of teaching. Sometimes even better than the level of public universities. Unfortunately the brightest and most ambitious students in Poland are unable to afford tuition fees at Poland’s private universities, even though the tuition in Poland is very modest compared to those in the U.S. The economic factors, once again, play a key role.

Considering the arguments mentioned above, it is fair to say that the Polish tertiary education system needs some years before it match the American system. There should be applied changes in financing, grading and credit-point systems and organization matters. Tertiary education system in America seems to work very good on the first look. Hopefully, when nobody will try to look at it with a magnifying glass, he might see some dirt after all. There is no perfect solution on how to deal with education system.
Very quick comments….

Although both Poland and the United States have very distinctive social, economic[] and geographic backgrounds, when it comes to tertiary education, there are many equivalents. First, both educational systems ensure access to equal educational opportunity for every individual. Second, both countries offer the same basic graduation levels: bachelor “licencjat”, master “magister” and PhD “doktor”. Third, the duration of a student’s study in both countries is approximately the same. Both systems have a lot in common; however, it is not as relevant as differences between both of them.

One of the easiest examples of distinction between both tertiary education systems is the yearly academic schedule. Here, the Polish norms are much stricter [or do you mean precise?] than those applied in USA. In America students begin the year late August or early September and they continue through May or June. In Poland, however, the academic year begins precisely on first October and continues up to 24th June. Both schedules vary also in terms. In America, universities usually have either two terms per academic year (semesters), three terms (trimesters) or four terms (quarters). Polish universities apply only one system of terms, one that divides an academic year into two semesters.

The next example can be noticed in the grading system. Most American universities tend to use letter grades, sometimes with their numerical equivalent. At the end of each term student receives grades, those are used to present his G.P.A. - Grade Point Average. The information about G.P.A. can be used by potential employers. Whenever a student receives an “F” (the lowest grade), it means that he will not receive credit points for the failed subject. Credit points are vital to receive a degree in USA. The situation in Poland, however, looks much different. The grading system is based on numeric grades from “one” to “six”, where “one” is the lowest. To pass, [a student] needs to receive at least “three.” For most Polish universities there is officially an ECTS system, but practically it is not [] used. Although there is also no official average grade system, students can and do compare their grades using easy mathematical equations.

Much more distinctive than examples mentioned above is the matter of financing higher education institutions in both countries. Polish government universities [may] be subsidized from government funds as well as from local self-governments' budgets. They [may] also receive donations. That goes the same for American universities. The only difference is that USA, one of the richest countries in the world, can spend much more on its educational system. [Moreover], most, if not all[,] American universities charge annual tuitions. According to polish law, government universities cannot [charge tuitions]. That reduces a large source of income. The money from college [tuitions] [may] be used in many ways, [including] upgrading existing student facilities, building new ones and many, many more. This is main reason of opening private universities in Poland. It gives wider choice of financing and is very attractive to students, not only by more advanced facilities but also by very good level of teaching.[sentence needs work] Sometimes even better than the level of public universities.[needs work] Unfortunately the brightest and most ambitious students in Poland are unable to afford tuition fees at Poland’s private universities, even though the tuition in Poland is very modest compared to those in the U.S. The economic factors, once again, play a key role.

Considering the arguments mentioned above, it is fair to say that the Polish tertiary education system needs [more time] before it [can] match the American system. There should be applied changes in financing, grading and credit-point systems and organization matters. [needs work] Tertiary education system in America seems to work very good on the first look. [see my prior corrections in a prior message—first look sounds goofy… “at first glance”]. Hopefully, when nobody will try to look at it with a magnifying glass, he might see some dirt after all.[1] There is no perfect solution on how to deal with education system.

[1] Some people complain when a sentence begins with hopefully.

See http://alt-usage-english.org/excerpts/fxhopefu.html
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
1st paragraph
economic[] - isn't it adjective, I don't get it anymoreEmotion: wink

2nd paragraph
[or do you mean precise?] - stricter in the meaning that they have precise date of the begining and the end. Precise is a a better word here though

4th/5th paragraph

.[needs work] will doEmotion: smile

EDIT:

two sentences that I worked on,

"There should applied changes in financing, grading and credit-point systems, and organization matters" changed to:

"There should be applied changes in financing, organization, grading and credit-point systems."

or:

"Changes are to be applied in financing, organization, grading and credit-point systems."

"Hopefully, when nobody will try to look at it with a magnifying glass, he might see some dirt after all." changed to:

"Wishfully thinking, nobody will try to look at it with a magnifying glass; he might see some dirt after all."

I applied some mistakes that I forgot to add after your first peer reviewEmotion: smile
For the rest I will live it like it is, I want my tutor to have something to correct tooEmotion: smile
Lukas,

"economic" is an adjective. So you are okay.

I agree, "precise" seems to be a better word.

4 & 5th paragraphs...something for you and your tutor

"There should applied changes in financing, grading and credit-point systems, and organization matters" changed to:

"There should be applied changes in financing, organization, grading and credit-point systems."

or:

"Changes are to be applied in financing, organization, grading and credit-point systems."


Maybe...

Changes are required in the financing, organization, grading, and credit-point systems.

Again, I am not commenting on your content, just your grammar.

Hopefully, when nobody will try to look at it with a magnifying glass, he might see some dirt after all." changed to:

"Wishfully thinking, nobody will try to look at it with a magnifying glass; he might see some dirt after all."


I'd just drop the "wishfully, hopefully" stuff. Or do this....

Nobody, I hope, will look at it with a magnifying glass because he might see some dirt after all.

Good luck.

MountainHiker
Thank you once more.
Tomorrow I have peer review with my class mates, after that the essay has to be handed in within 24 hoursEmotion: smile
I will let you know how it went,

now I'm trying to write my second one,

once more BIG THANKSEmotion: smile

and take care!

Lukas:)
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