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I remember during [the] summertime, we would go fly fishing by the river.

1 IS the optional?

I want my money back for the ring.

2 What's the relationship between my money and the ring? my ring?

Thanks.
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New2grammarI remember during [the] summertime, we would go fly fishing by the river.

1 IS the optional? Yes.

I want my money back for the ring.

2 What's the relationship between my money and the ring? my ring? I'd say the relationship is only contextual (not grammatical). I think "my money back" is an idiom, and object of the verb. "For the ring" modifies the object.
(I'll probably get clobbered on this.)
Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
AvangiI'd say the relationship is only contextual (not grammatical).
I sort of understand your meaning. I believe you're saying the meaning changes depending on the context.

For example,
My girlfriend dumped me and changed her phone number. I called her several times but she never returned my calls.I know she sold the ring and I'm twenty thousand in debt for buying her nice things including the diamond ring.
That's partially what I meant. Indirectly, it's exactly what I meant.

You asked about a relationship between your money and your ring. I wasn't sure if you meant a grammatical relationship or a contextual relationship.

"Money" is sort of embedded in what I'm calling an idiom, and therefore is difficult, if not impossible, to analyze grammatically on it's own. So we're left with the context.

As you show, this would vary considerably from sentence to sentence. (But that's a little too obvious, isn't it?) In other words, there's no fixed contextual relationship between "my money" and "my ring."

My original reply to your post was really not worthy of all this deliberation. It was just bad.

Your last post was very well written, BTW. I do get your point. We usually speak of context when showing that a word or phrase has different meanings in different contexts. But the money and the ring don't seem to change very much in the second example, in terms of basic meaning.