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Hello,

Could you check my sentences, please?

Will we be met at the station?
The answer will be sent in a few days.
When have you been asked about (it)?
When have you been inquired abou (it)?
This translation will be fiished/done/made in a few days.
Will this book be returned in time?(Or on time?)
He will be met by his father at the station.
This picture was written in XVI century.
Are these books used for work?
We will be shown many sightseeings in Italy.
In Italy we will be shown many sightseeings.
This man was followed by a huge/large crowd.
When a story was being read, somebody knocked at the door.
Have you already been invited to/for the evening?
When the mother came home, the dinner had alredy been boilt.

Thanks
Comments  
When have you been asked about it?-- 'Were' is much more usual.
When have you been inquired about it?-- Not possible with this verb here.
This translation will be fiished/done/made in a few days.
Will this book be returned in/on time? -- 'In time' = before the deadline; 'on time' = at the proper time.
This picture was drawn in the XVI century.
We will be shown many sights in Italy.
In Italy we will be shown many sights.
Have you already been invited for the evening?
When the mother came home, the dinner had already been prepared/cooked.

The others are OK.
Ah, sightseeing is an activity that's why my sentence was wrong, right? Could I use 'attractions' instead?
A student wrote these two sentences (When have you been asked about it? and When have you been inquired about it) instead of 'when have you(the students) been tested— or given an oral test. Is it wrong to use the two original sentences instead of 'when have you(the students) been tested? or given an oral test(?)
Why couldn't I use 'boilt'? I had to underline in my sentence that it was boilt.

Could you reply to my other posts too, please?
http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/MySentences/bbvlkq/post.htm
and http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/MyCorrections/bbvlkz/post.htm

They have already been replied, but I just really wonder your opinion.

Thanks
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Ah, sightseeing is an activity that's why my sentence was wrong, right?-- Yes.
Could I use 'attractions' instead?-- Yes, but they are a subset of 'sights'.

A student wrote these two sentences (When have you been asked about it? and When have you been inquired about it) instead of 'when have you(the students) been tested— or given an oral test. Is it wrong to use the two original sentences instead of 'when have you(the students) been tested?— or given an oral test(?)-- 'When have you been tested / been given an oral test': These are correct.

Why couldn't I use 'boilt'? I had to underline in my sentence that it was boilt.-- Two reasons: (1 ) boiling is only one mode (and a generally vapid one) of cooking, and (2 ) your spelling of the word is archaic.
http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/MySentences/bbvlkq/post.htm

Advice from Anonymous in New Jersey, Summit, is always good.
So I can't use to inquire and to ask when I need to find out if the students were tested, can I?

Thanks
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Your question is too confusing now. I fail to see what concerns you about the constructions. Please reformulate your question from the beginning.
I am sorry for that, I will try once again.

When have you been asked about it?-- When have you been inquired about it? I used the verbs to ask and to inquire instead of the verb to test in these two sentences. I should have written 'when have you been tested? It's only my guess that I can't use to ask and to inquire in this sentence-'when have you been tested? Am I wrong? Can I use them?
Thanks
It is the grammar, not the verb choice that is wrong. You can do this:

When have you been asked about it?
When has someone inquired of you about it?

'Inquired' does not appear in passive voice.
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