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What's the "normal" name for each of the Canadian moneys with face value of the following:

$100, $50, $20, $10, $5, $2, $1, $0.50, $0.25, $0.10, $0.05.

By normal, I mean people usually use it when withdrawing money with a bank clerk's help.

Thank you very much

Osee
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Just as with US money: one hundred dollars, fifty dollars, twenty dollars, ten dollars, five dollars, two dollars, one dollar (casually called a 'loonie' when it is a coin), fifty cents, twenty-five cents, ten cents, five cents.
Hi Mister Micawber,

Thanks. But I maybe confused you. I am trying to clarify my question.

So just imagining this. I want to withdraw $1000 from my bank. I want the money I get to be like this: 5 pieces of paper moneys with face value $100, 10 pieces of paper moneys with face value $50. If saying this way to the bank clerk, it sounds awkward. So I want to know what is the normal way to say in such a situation?

Osee
Mister MicawberJust as with US money: one hundred dollars, fifty dollars, twenty dollars, ten dollars, five dollars, two dollars, one dollar (casually called a 'loonie' when it is a coin), fifty cents, twenty-five cents, ten cents, five cents.

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Universally, paper money units are 'bills' and metal money units are 'coins'

A one-hundred-dollar bill, five fifty-dollar bills and two twenty-five-cent coins total $350.50.
Hi guys,

I want the money I get to be like this: 5 pieces of paper moneys with face value $100, 10 pieces of paper moneys with face value $50.

If I may comment, I'd simply say "I'd like five hundreds and ten fifties, please''.

Best wishes, Clive
Do you use the words nickel, dime and quarter in Canada too?

In the UK, we would also say "a twenty", and "a fifty", but the ten pound note is often called "a tenner" and the five pound note "a fiver". Informally, we would say 'quid' for 'pound/s' (e.g. Lend me a quid. His new bike cost four hundred quid.).

In London dialect, specific sums of money have nicknames which you rarely hear, although sometimes market traders still use them. For example, twenty pounds is an apple, twenty-five pounds is a pony and five hundred quid is a monkey. The theme tune for the telly programme Only Fools and Horses starts, "Stick a pony in your pocket...".
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Hi,

Do you use the words nickel, dime and quarter in Canada too? Yes, we do. One thing we don't say, however, is the American expression, 'two bits'.

Our one dollar coinsn is commonly called 'a loonie', because it has a picture of a loon on one side. By extension, our two dollar coin has thus come to be called 'a twoonie', because it rhymnes.

Clive
Hi Clive, May I continue to ask the names for the rest of Canadian $10, $5, $0.01 in your simply way, like 10 hundreds, 10 twenties?

Are you going to say 10 tens, 10 fives, and 10 coins of 1 cent or whatever?

Thanks.
CliveHi,

Do you use the words nickel, dime and quarter in Canada too? Yes, we do. One thing we don't say, however, is the American expression, 'two bits'.

Our one dollar coinsn is commonly called 'a loonie', because it has a picture of a loon on one side. By extension, our two dollar coin has thus come to be called 'a twoonie', because it rhymnes.

Clive
Hi,

May I continue to ask the names for the rest of Canadian $10, $5, $0.01 in your simply way, like 10 hundreds, 10 twenties?<<< Yes, that's what I'd typically say.

Are you going to say 10 tens, 10 fives, Yes

and 10 coins of 1 cent or whatever? I'd say something like 'In my pocket, I have ten pennies.' Cents are commonly referred to as pennies, at least where I live.

'I have 10 cents' could mean a dime, so I might make it clear by saying 'I have 10 one-cent coins'.

But really, I don't often feel the need to have precise conversations about the coins I have or want. I usually don't care.Emotion: smile

Best wishes, Clive
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