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Hi!
His painting is similar to Van Gough

Can anyone explain to me why wasn't this thrase go like this:
'His painting is similar to Van Gough's.'

To me, 'His painting is similar to Van Gough' is more like this person's painting looks like Van Gough himself, the appearance of Van Gough. But that doesn't make sense.
'His painting is similar to Van Gough's.' is more likely meaning this person's painting looks like Van Gough's painting.

I have met across several times people would take it as a mistake by using 's. Like this one:

"Hati's theory" is one of the most profound invention by Hati.

Someone came to me and rewrite it as just the 'Hati theory'. I took it as it was a mistake.

Was I wrong?

Thank you in advance. -Terr3
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Terr3Hi! His painting is similar to Van Gough Can anyone explain to me why wasn't this thrase go like this: 'His painting is similar to Van Gough's.' To me, 'His painting is similar to Van Gough' is more like this person's painting looks like Van Gough himself, the appearance of Van Gough. But that doesn't make sense. 'His painting is similar to Van Gough's.' is more likely meaning this person's painting looks like Van Gough's painting. I have met across several times people would take it as a mistake by using 's. Like this one: "Hati's theory" is one of the most profound invention by Hati. Someone came to me and rewrite it as just the 'Hati theory'. I took it as it was a mistake. Was I wrong? Thank you in advance. -Terr3
I believe that the people you have come across are wrong and that you are right.
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Thank you Philip