Here's a new one for me, at least.
I noticed this evening that BBC Radio 3 has been doing Chopin as "Composer of the Week". That's pleasing: I've had a soft spot for Chopin from quite a young age, which I retain.
Anyway: the website spells his first name as "Fryderyk" a spelling which has clearly popped its charming little head into circulation while I wasn't paying attention.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10
Here's a new one for me, at least. I noticed this evening that BBC Radio 3 has been doing ... as "Fryderyk" a spelling which has clearly popped its charming little head into circulation while I wasn't paying attention.

I believe that it is the Polish spelling.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Here's a new one for me, at least. I noticed this evening that BBC Radio 3 has been doing ... name as "Fryderyk" aspelling which has clearly popped its charming little head into circulation while I wasn't paying attention.

New to me, too. I had a look on Google.pl, though, and it seems that's the way they spell it, so we can hardly complain. But didn't he himself prefer the French version? If he did, then I'm not quite sure pl is right.
Mike.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Here's a new one for me, at least. I ... charming little head into circulation while I wasn't paying attention.

I believe that it is the Polish spelling.

That sounds right, but I'm not entirely sure about it.

The website of "the Frederick Chopin Society in Warsaw" http://www.chopin.pl/spis tresci/index en.html has "Frederick" in the Society's name and "Fryderyk" in the graphic, which suggests you're right.
But if you click on the "Polish version" link, the name in there is "Fryderyka Chopina". Does that mean that "Fryderyk" is an English transliteration of the Polish version of the name, rather than an adoption of the Polish spelling?
(I've googled for him on "baptismal certificate", but all the hits appear to be from the same source, and are discussing his date of birth rather than the spelling of the name.)

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
Here's a new one for me, at least. I noticed this evening that BBC Radio 3 has been doing ... as "Fryderyk" a spelling which has clearly popped its charming little head into circulation while I wasn't paying attention.

Perhaps you were paying attention only to English writers - a biography of Chopin at:

has a bibliography which lists books in English, French, German and his native Polish. Skimming it, I see that whist the English prefer "Frederick", the French opt for "Frédéric", the Germans are torn between "Frederic" and "Friedrich", and the Poles use "Fryderyk". Since Chopin was Polish, it would seem that if anybody has a claim to to being correct, it would be them, don't you think?
I wonder how his (French) surname would be pronounced by a Pole.

Mark Barratt
Budapest
Skitt wrote

I believe that it is the Polish spelling.

That sounds right, but I'm not entirely sure about it. The website of "the Frederick Chopin Society in Warsaw" ... "Fryderyk" is an English transliteration of the Polish version of the name, rather than an adoption of the Polish spelling?

What you are seeing in the Polish version you quote is the genitive of the name. Using the equivalent of "mister" requires the genitive. In the rest of the article, they are usually talking about his style and accomplishments and such, not just stating his name. There are several inflection forms of the name seen in the article.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
But if you click on the "Polish version" link, the name in there is "Fryderyka Chopina". Does that mean that "Fryderyk" is an English transliteration of the Polish version of the name, rather than an adoption of the Polish spelling?

No. We'd need a Polish speaker to confirm this, but I think that the -a is a case ending. One of the books in the bibliography (see my other post in this thread) is entitled "Korespondencja Fryderyka Chopina", the translation of which is given as "Chopin's Correspondance". Remember that Chopin's father was French, and the surname is definitely "Chopin".

Mark Barratt
Budapest
Here's a new one for me, at least. I ... charming little head into circulation while I wasn't paying attention.

Perhaps you were paying attention only to English writers - a biography of Chopin at: has a bibliography ... it would seem that if anybody has a claim to to being correct, it would be them, don't you think?

Yabbut why should the Beeb use "Fryderyk"?

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
On 24 Oct 2004, Mark Barratt wrote

Perhaps you were paying attention only to English writers - ... to being correct, it would be them, don't you think?

Yabbut why should the Beeb use "Fryderyk"?

Well, they are the Beeb. You should see what the Latvians do with it, but that requires diacritics not readily visible to most in this group. Then, of course, there are the seven cases ...

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more