Hello,
I am writing a scientific text with a lot of letter symbols in it. To make things worse, the symbols represent values of various types: there are scalars, 2D vectors, 3D vectors, matrices and much more.
To limit the amount of confusion, I am putting funny "marks" like arrows, boxes etc above the letters, to signal what type each value is (e.g. a letter with an arrow over it is a vector).

I am appending two "legends" to my text. One legend explains what type of value each funny "mark" indicates;
the other explains the symbols themselves.
My problem is what I should call those legends to make their role clear and not create even more confusion. I have named the first one "Notation for the various categories of quantities", and I am thinking of calling the second one "Notation for individual quantities", but this is neither elegant nor very clear; in fact, I don't even think it is intelligible.
Thank you for any constructive suggestions,
(-) Leszek.
Example:
And the formula
for mechanical work is:
"W"={F}.{D}
Which completes the proof.

Notation for the various categories of quantities: "A" - scalar value
{A} - vector in 3D space
Notation for individual quantities:
"W" - work
{F} - force
{D} - displacement
1 2
Hello, I am writing a scientific text with a lot of letter symbols in it. To make things worse, the ... vector in 3D space Notation for individual quantities: "W" - work {F} - force {D} - displacement

Textbooks simply say, 'Glossary of X terms', Glossary of Y terms.'
Uzytkownik (Email Removed) napisal w wiadomosci
Textbooks simply say, 'Glossary of X terms', Glossary of Y terms.'

I am not sure if I understand you correctly. Are you saying that "scalar, vector, matrix, tensor" are "X terms", while "mass, force, rotation, stress" are "Y terms"?

Regards,
L.
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Hello, I am writing a scientific text with a lot of letter symbols in it. To make things worse, the ... vector in 3D space Notation for individual quantities: "W" - work {F} - force {D} - displacement

G'day Leszek,
The standard formula is W=FS where W is work done, F is force applied and S is the distance the force is applied over. Perhaps you have a programming reason for your notations.

JohnW
Textbooks simply say, 'Glossary of X terms', Glossary of Y terms.'

I am not sure if I understand you correctly. Are you saying that "scalar, vector, matrix, tensor" are "X terms", while "mass, force, rotation, stress" are "Y terms"? Regards, L.

It's customary to use x & y to differentiate 2 areas, eg Someoone might have x reason, another y reason to disagree.
Anyway, you have 2 areas and I suspect you wish to provide separate glossaries for each.
eg a physics text on mechanics, heat, sound might provide

Glossary of Mechanics Terms
Glossary of Heat Terms
Glossary of Sound Terms
Uzytkownik "jjw1937" (Email Removed) napisal w wiadomosci
G'day Leszek,

Hello, and thank you for trying to help. Perhaps I have not made myself clear enough - sorry about that. Here is some more explanation:
The standard formula is W=FS where W is work done, F is force applied and S is the distance the force is applied over. Perhaps you have a programming reason for your notations.

No, I am following in the footsteps of many scientific authors in using features such as italics, uppercase/lowercase, boldface, and marks (like arrows) placed above letters, to indicate various types of physical quantities: scalars, vectors, tensors, matrices and so on.
As I am using many different types, I feel I need a glossary to explain exactly which type is meant by which of those graphic forms. That is one glossary. In the simplified example I gave in my previous post, I placed various kinds of braces around my letters because I don't know how to put italics or boldface in a plain-ASCII posting, let alone arrows over letters. In my actual text, I do not use such braces, I use arrows and other marks above letters.
This first of my two glossaries will explain that:

- a letter with nothing special about it
represents a scalar,
- a letter with a thin arrow above it
represents a 2D Euclidean vector;
- a letter with a thick arrow and a dot above it
represents a 3D projective vector,
etc etc ad nauseam, for about 10 different types.
The other glossary will simply explain which letter represents which quantity.
This is not the same as having one glossary for, say, chemical values, and another for electromagnetic ones.

What I am asking of this group is to help me find
the best way to name my two glossaries, in English.

I hope my problem is clearer now.
Cheers,
Leszek.
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I'd call the arrow section Guide to Symbols Used or just Symbols Used

You could then call the second section Technical Terms Used
Uzytkownik "John Ramsay" (Email Removed) napisal w wiadomosci
I'd call the arrow section Guide to Symbols Used or just Symbols Used You could then call the second section Technical Terms Used

I think I will settle for "Notation used" and "Symbols used".

Thanks to all those who replied, you have all helped me find what I think is the right solution.
Cheers - L.
I'd call the arrow section Guide to Symbols Used or just Symbols Used You could then call the second section Technical Terms Used

I think I will settle for "Notation used" and "Symbols used". Thanks to all those who replied, you have all helped me find what I think is the right solution.

What whuld you say about 'glossary of types used'?

T. D.
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