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English vowels which are typically oral (the air is realised through the mouth).

I don't get it and what the differences?

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mosja

English vowels which are typically oral (the air is realised released through the mouth).

I don't get it and what the differences?

Typically oral? I'd say always oral. I don't think they're talking about standard English if they're focusing on nasal vowels in English.

If you want to hear nasal vowels, listen to French. It's hard to say a whole sentence in French without using a nasal vowel.

CJ

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How do you say in oral?

mosja

How do you say in oral?

What do you mean? Are you asking how oral vowels sound? All the vowels of English are oral vowels. Say A, E, I, O, U. You're saying oral vowels.

CJ

What about twang? You hold your breath while speaking right? (No nasality).

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Twang? That's what ordinary people call nasality in regional dialects. Sometimes people also use it to mean a particular kind of accented speech: American twang (accent); Russian twang (accent); and so on.

'twang' is not a term from linguistics.

You can't hold your breath while speaking. It's physically impossible. Put your hands over your mouth and nose tightly so that absolutely no air can escape. Try to speak. It's not going to happen.

For more about 'twang', see

https://www.google.com/search?source=hp&ei=cuMNXbfnNMf0swXkg5iADA&q=who+speaks+with+a+twang%3F&oq...

CJ

Nasal is when you speak through your nose, right? What do ordinary people speak in? Oral?

It's pretty tricky to spot the differences between nasal, twang or oral.

Can't open the link anyway.

mosjaNasal is when you speak through your nose, right?

Yes, in a way. You're not speaking through your nose exactly. You're closing off the passage between your vocal chords and your mouth. That forces the air to go through the nose. But it's so little air that you don't feel it. It only seems like the sound is coming through your nose.

Vowels that are nasal sound like they have an N or NG at the end of them.

I'll bet if you found a video online that explains French vowels, you could hear how they sound. French has four nasal vowels. The rest are oral (not nasal).

mosjaWhat do ordinary people speak in? Oral?

Well if you're an ordinary person in France, you'll be using some nasal vowels, but most of the vowels will be oral. That's just how French is.

English has no nasal vowels, so both ordinary people and extraordinary people use only oral vowels when they speak English.


See if you can access this video. It explains "twang", which is not really the same as "nasal", though many people incorrectly identify it as such.

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Twang is produced by closing the vocal tract deep in the throat, at the epiglottis. Nasality is produced by closing the vocal tract less deep, at the velum.

To learn English you do not have to know anything about these things, and you certainly don't have to learn how to produce such sounds.

CJ

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

But why many brits sound like nasal? Though they use oral vowels, but the accent sounds nasal unless you hear to the BBC One announcer or news reporters.

Ps. Already watched that video anyway.

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