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Well, I have seen nouns act as noun modifiers, but since nation is in plural I was wondering if it was of correct usage to say: "nations efforts" rather than "nations' efforts".
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nations' efforts -- otherwise there is no possession and it's just a random couple of words strung together

"Powers struggles amongst Iraqi Shia"

Is the above incorrect then?
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wholegrain

"Powers struggles amongst Iraqi Shia"

Is the above incorrect then?

Power struggles amongst Iraqi Shia.
Why is it correct in singular, but wrong in plural?
I take it that this is a headline.

Power struggles (are going on) amongst Iraqi Shia.
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wholegrainWhy is it correct in singular, but wrong in plural?

Power is used as an adjective. What sort of struggles? Power struggles.

(If the headline meant that the highly placed people, referred to as "the powers," were struggling, then the stuggle becomes a verb and would need to be in the plural. )
But why?

I mean if we would be referring to something that modifies a noun in general, we would say noun modifier.

But think of a particular noun modifier that modifies two nouns, wouldn't it be practical to say nouns modifier in this instance? ex: grass death bringer

...or when referring to particular instances? ex: developed nations efforts

Don't you think this usage should be accepted at the least if it isn't?
The efforts of developed nations = developed nations' efforts.

Most nouns, when used to modify other nouns, are used in the singular. (Sports is the one example I can think of that stays plural.)

Car park, bed room, cherry pie, conference room, etc.

There's little point in asking anyone if it "should" be accepted.
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