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People of Western world, particularly Americans, tend to think of time as something fixed in nature, something arround us from which we cannot escape, an ever-present part of the environment, just like the air we breethe.

My book interprets the 'nature' above as 'the natural environment'. Is it really so?

I think it's rather close to the 'essential characteristics and qualities'...
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Comments  (Page 2) 
MilkyJust a side note: around.
?? What do you mean??
Yes, English is my mother tongue. I think "the fixation of time in the natural environment" simply means time, the passing of time. It's 'fixed' (... unless you've learnt to time travel!)
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I initially read:
fixed in nature= immutable, of a fixed nature
but I have to recognize, it could well mean
permanent in the nature around us
It's confusing.
I still read it in the 'fixed in nature=immutable' sense. The other meaning doesn't make sense.
Nona The BritI still read it in the 'fixed in nature=immutable' sense. The other meaning doesn't make sense.
Just out of cuirosity, nona, why do you think the other meaning doesn't make sense?
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People think that time is fixed in the natural environment? Well, that doesn't make much sense to me.

1. It suggests that people would think that time isn't fixed in other environments.

2. Who thinks that time is fixed in the natural environment anyway? As opposed to what? Not exactly a common belief...I can't even get my head round it.
It's not that time is fixed, it's that the always-moving-forward, can't-go-back and can't-stand-still ASPECT of time is a "given" in our environment.

But this is one of the cases when over-analyzing isn't really helping, I think. We all understand the meaning of the sentence, even if we aren't sure what sense of the word he meant.
Nona The BritPeople think that time is fixed in the natural environment? Well, that doesn't make much sense to me.

1. It suggests that people would think that time isn't fixed in other environments.

Exactly.
Grammar GeekWe all understand the meaning of the sentence, even if we aren't sure what sense of the word he meant.
But Annvan, whose first language is English and who is a teacher of English, seems to have a different idea.

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But I think that regardless of which definition of "nature" you pick, the essense of the sentence is people they they just have to accept that [the passing of] time is a factor in our lives that we can't do anything about. Whether it's "fixed in our environment" or "unchanging in its nature," either way, time is something we just have to accept "as-is."

Who else has another interpretation of the the entire sentence?
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