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Hi,

I am just wondering the meaning of "nature is calling" in "Nature is calling. I want to use the bathroom"?

Do you only use it in such a case?

(Could anyone give me some examples on it please?)

Thanks in advance.
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I think that's the only way I've actually ever heard it used. But your next sentence would more appropriate as 'I need to use the bathroom'.
Dear Victory County,

You may sometimes hear «the call of nature». It is perhaps more common.

Kind regards, Emotion: smile

Goldmund
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Hehe, that's a funny way to say, when someone need to go to the bathroom. I ever heard " ** is answering the call of nature in a urinal." But I was wondering the origin of the phrase. Could you explain for us?
Hi,

I think the idea is just that our bodily needs are a natural function. 'Call' has the sense that these functions can not be ignored.

It's a mildly humorous cliche. In a less informal situation, you'd probably say something like 'Please excuse me for a moment' or 'I have to go to the bathroom'. As the formality increases, the direct references decrease.

Best wishes, Clive
CliveHi,

I think the idea is just that our bodily needs are a natural function. 'Call' has the sense that these functions can not be ignored.

It's a mildly humorous cliche. In a less informal situation, you'd probably say something like 'Please excuse me for a moment' or 'I have to go to the bathroom'. As the formality increases, the direct references decrease.

Best wishes, Clive

Men often "go to see a man about a dog"; ladies, especially with more than one, often "go powder" their noses.
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I suppose 'call of nature' in this context must once have been a parody of some more Thoreauvian sentiment (cf. 'the call of the wild').

MrP
Hi,

I guess there's a lot of slang and informal ways to say this. I'm very familiar with these last two, especially the man/dog thing, but they sound rather old-fashioned to me. The man/dog thing is very British, I think.

Slang always sounds wrong if you don't use it right! Generally, my advice to learners of English would be to avoid slang unless you're absolutely it's right and appropriate for the situation.

Best wishes again, Clive
Clive The man/dog thing is very British, I think.

I've heard it all my life: Colorado as a youth, Washington state as an adult: total of 61 years.
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