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ex) It will also wake up others who are sleeping near/nearby.


I think that both 'near' and 'nearby' can be used in the sentence.

But some people say 'nearby' is recommendable.

Is there any difference between 'near' and 'nearby' ?

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"near" is not possible there.

"nearby" is fine.

Comments  

"Near" is indeed an adverb with all the powers of one, but it sounds old-fashioned in your sentence. The reader expects the prepositonal "near" (… sleeping near the place.). Use "nearby".

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 GPY's reply was promoted to an answer.

Near as an adverb is possible when time is referred to: The day of his operation is near.

CB

Cool Breeze

Near as an adverb is possible when time is referred to: The day of his operation is near.

That looks more like an adjective to me.

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GPYThat looks more like an adjective to me.

5. adverb [ADVERB after verb, be ADVERB]

If a time or event draws near, it will happen soon. The time for my departure from Japan was drawing nearer every day.(Collins Online Dictionary)CB
GPY"near" is not possible there.

Really?

Dictionary says that 'near' can be used as adverb.

When it comes to adverb, 'near' and 'nearby' are different?

Cool Breeze5. adverb [ADVERB after verb, be ADVERB]
If a time or event draws near, it will happen soon. The time for my departure from Japan was drawing nearer every day. (Collins Online Dictionary) CB

Well, further down on that page (https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/near_1) they give this definition under "adjective":

6. (postpositive)
not far away in time; imminent
departure time was near

Their example is closely analogous to your "The day of his operation is near."

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HoonyDictionary says that 'near' can be used as adverb.

Sometimes, yes, but not to modify arbitrary verbs.

HoonyWhen it comes to adverb, 'near' and 'nearby' are different?

In usage, yes. "nearby" can be used with arbitrary verbs. E.g.

He was sitting nearby.
A new restaurant opened nearby.
The stolen property was found nearby.
etc.

We do not use "near" in such cases in ordinary modern English. (You may find examples in poetic or literary language, or in old books.)