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Hello everyone,

First, I'd like to apologize for the confusing thread title. Do the sentences below sound normal to you?

- I live in a small town near the Dutch-Belgian border. (I don't.)

- I live in a small town by the Dutch-Belgian border.

- I live in a small town on the Dutch-Belgian border.

To be honest, all of them make sense to me, but their meanings are slightly different. I am not sure if "by" sounds natural, though. Also, can we say "...on/near the border with the Netherlands"?


Thank you.

Comments  

Only the third sentence would be heard. Saying "near" or "by" the border confuses things and generates questions like: How near? How close by? On which side of the border?

Thank you.

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There's something I forgot to mention. I've also seen "I live in a town on the border of the Netherlands". Does it sound natural to you? To me it suggests that the Netherlands has only one border and that's not true.

Gene93I am not sure if "by" sounds natural, though.

It does. It is equivalent to using near and is not specific.

Understood. What about this one: "I live in a town on the border of the Netherlands" (knowing that the speaker is Belgian)? I find it a little strange, but I am not a native.

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Gene93I find it a little strange,

It seems fine.

Gene93(knowing that the speaker is Belgian)

That is the context so, it is fine. Belgium has one border with the Netherlands so, it is logical.