Hi,

Despite my searching in dictionaries, I'm not able to see the differences of these adjectives in meaning. Could you shed some light on them, please? All seem to mean that someone's wear is clean, orderly and in good taste. Thank you!

Here are a few brief and quick comments.


neat and tidy are common terms and very similar

trim in good order, eg buttons buttoned, shoe laces tied

natty a bit negative, sounds like the person is trying too hard to be well-dressed. A rather old-fashioned word.

spruce rarely said today.

dapper slightly negative in tone, a slightly humorous thing to say

trig I've never heard this term

Hi Clive,

Many-many thanks! I've just discovered your reply, I was looking and looking in 6-7 dictionaries and other sites today as well, and still... the entries make look the words entirely different than their real usage!!

What would you use for someone whose clothing is in good-taste, please?

And whose in bad taste?

(I've found tawdry, gaudy, garish... I guess these are out-of-date, too?)

Finally, could you, please, let me know how and where I can find reliable entries regarding present-day meanings and meaning shades of words? Thank you very much. <3

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What would you use for someone whose clothing is in good-taste, please? well-dressed

And whose in bad taste?

(I've found tawdry, gaudy, garish... I guess these are out-of-date, too? Yes, they are.) It's harder to find suitable words for this. Maybe 'flashy'.

Finally, could you, please, let me know how and where I can find reliable entries regarding present-day meanings and meaning shades of words? No, but maybe someone else will make a suggestion.

I recommend that you red a lot to improve your vocabulary, but it takes time.

Clive

Hi Clive,


Thank you so much for your insight. I've thought of corpuses to check the real usage of a word but I've found that they often include sentences from decades earlier and even when I read topical articles, nuances like pejorative or humorous do not come through, let alone the fact whether the term is out-of-date and is used only to add some "colour" to the text, or is present-day English.


And that's only about checking a word.


Do crosswords in English also contain out-of-date terms?


I will register here ( :

anonymousDo crosswords in English also contain out-of-date terms?

The more difficult ones do. The simpler ones do not.

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