Hi Teachers,

Could you correct these sentences if necessary?

a) On the floor of my house there lots of hair of my dog, should be, 'There are lots of hair of my dog on the floor of my house'. Righ?

b) Last weekend John earned money by working as barman, should be, 'Last weekend John earned (some) money working as a barman'. Right?

c) You never have to give up, you have to go straight the end, should be, 'You never have to give up anything, you have to go straight until the end'. Right?

d) Maria died in a traffic accident, should be, 'Maria died in a car accident'. Right?

e) My sister lives five kmts away from my house, should be, 'My sister lives five kms away from my house'. Right?

f) I was so tired that I hardly arrived at the end, should be, 'I was so tired that I could hardly arrived at the end'. Right?

g) A thought struck me during my dinner and I could solve the problem.

Thanks in advance
a) There is a lot of dog hair on the floor in my house.

b) Last weekend, John earned (some) money working as a barman.

c) You never have to give up anything, you have to go straight until the end.

d) Maria died in a traffic accident. "Maria died in a car accident." (both are correct)

e) My sister lives five km away from my house.

f) I was so tired, that I barely get to the end.

g) A thought struck me during my dinner and I could solve the problem. ( This is correct, but it depends on the context clues (The sentences that come before and after this one.))
Thinking Spaina) On the floor of my house there lots of hair of my dog, should be, 'There are lots of hair of my dog on the floor of my house'. Righ?
There is dog hair all over the floors of my house.

My dog is shedding; he's left a lot of dog hair all over the house. (It would be not just on the floor, but on your furniture, too!)
Thinking Spain 'Last weekend John earned (some) money working as a barman'. Right?
Yes, but Americans would say bartender.
Thinking Spainc) You never have to give up, you have to go straight the end, should be, 'You never have to give up anything, you have to go straight until the end'. Right?
I think you mean this: Never give up - see it through to the end.
Thinking Spaind) Maria died in a traffic accident, should be, 'Maria died in a car accident'. Right?
Either is OK.
Thinking Spaine) My sister lives five kmts away from my house, should be, 'My sister lives five kms away from my house'. Right?
The abbreviation of kilometer(s) is km.

My sister lives five km from my house.

Thinking Spainf) I was so tired that I hardly arrived at the end, should be, 'I was so tired that I could hardly arrived at the end'. Right?
I think you mean this: I was so tired that I nearly didn't get to the end.
Thinking Spaing) A thought struck me during my dinner and I could solve the problem.
I think you mean this:
The thought struck me during my dinner that I could solve the problem.
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Hi Key1,

Thanks a lot for your reply and help.

Key1e) My sister lives five km away from my house.
So, in English it doesn't mater if you say '1 km' or '5 km', the abbreviation is always 'km''?

TS
Hi AlpheccaStars,

Thanks a lot for your reply and time.

Few doubts though.
AlpheccaStarsThere is dog hair all over the floors of my house.
Is It not consistent to say 'floor' in singular. Because the floor of my house is the whole floor. On a second thought, maybe you are saying that my house has, let's say, three floors, right?

AlpheccaStarsI think you mean this: I was so tired that I nearly didn't get to the end.
I can't use 'hardly' in this context? For example, 'I was so tired that I hardly get to the end'.

Best regards

TS
Thinking SpainHi Teachers,
Could you correct these sentences if necessary?

a) On the floor of my house there lots of hair of my dog, should be, 'There are lots of hair of my dog on the floor of my house'. Righ? They sound awkward to me. My take is: My dog's hair is all all the floor of my house.

b) Last weekend John earned money by working as barman, should be, 'Last weekend John earned (some) money working as a barman'. Right? My take: John earned some money last weekend working as a bartender.

c) You never have to give up, you have to go straight the end, should be, 'You never have to give up anything, you have to go straight until the end'. Right? It sounds ok. I have no opinion since it has no further context to go by.

d) Maria died in a traffic accident, should be, 'Maria died in a car accident'. Right? Bot hare ok, the first one is preferred.

e) My sister lives five kmts away from my house, should be, 'My sister lives five kms away from my house'. Right?

f) I was so tired that I hardly arrived at the end, should be, 'I was so tired that I could hardly arrived at the end'. Right?

g) A thought struck me during my dinner and I could solve the problem. A thought sturck me during dinner that could help me solve the problem.

Thanks in advance

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Hi dimsumexpress,

Thanks a lot for your reply and takes.

Best regards

TS
Thinking SpainThere is dog hair all over the floors of my house.
Is It not consistent to say 'floor' in singular. Because the floor of my house is the whole floor. On a second thought, maybe you are saying that my house has, let's say, three floors, right?

My house is on one level. So it is a single-story house. In that sense, it has one floor.

But each room of my house has a different floor. (The part of the room that you walk on.)

The kitchen and bathrooms have tile floors, the living room has a wood floor, and the bedroom floors are carpeted. Floor in this sense means flooring.
Thinking SpainThanks a lot for your reply and time." I can't use 'hardly' in this context? For example, 'I was so tired that I hardly get to the end'.
It should be: 'I was so tired that I hardly got to the end'.

It's ok, but I would more naturally use the negative as a contrast - "almost / nearly did not get to the end."

This would be an alternative in the postive:

'I was so tired that I barely made it to the end'.

I use hardly in these sort of contexts:

We had hardly any rain yesterday.

He hardly ever comes to our events.

Hi AlpheccaStars,

Wow! Thanks a lot for your detailed explanation. I've learnt with it.Emotion: nodding

Best regards

TS
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