Hi Teachers,

Could you correct these sentences if necessary?

a) After the class I’ll go back towards my house. It sounds wrong, but the senteces should have 'towards'.

b) In the middle of the darkness I couldn’t find they keys. Shouldn't it be, 'I couldn't find my keys in the middle of the darkness'.

c) He owns a chain of sport shops.

Thanks in advance
a) After the class I’ll go back towards my house. It sounds wrong, Good call but the sentences should have 'towards'. (because that's what you assigned, I suppose)

All you need for this is After class I'll go home.

towards:

As I walked towards my house, I noticed that someone had left a package at the front door.

b) In the middle of the darkness I couldn’t find they keys. Shouldn't it be, 'I couldn't find my keys in the middle of the darkness'. No middle. The correct idiom is in the dark. It's the keys, not they keys.

I couldn't find the keys in the dark. You were right about the order of the clauses.

c) He owns a chain of sport shops. Fine.

CJ
Hi Jim,

Thanks a lot for your reply, corrections, and patience with me.
CalifJim(because that's what you assigned, I suppose)
How come you always figure out everything?Emotion: geeked

But 'dark' and 'darkness' both mean in Spanish 'oscuridad'. What's the difference between them, please?

Best regards

Sleep well

TS

PS By the way, what's the meaning of 'Good call'?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Thinking Spain'dark' and 'darkness' both mean in Spanish 'oscuridad'. What's the difference between them, please?
darkness is more abstract, I suppose. It's more like the property of being dark. in the darkness is more suitable for poetry, let's say.
Thinking Spainwhat's the meaning of 'Good call'?
~ Atinaste. You made a good call ~ You selected (called out) a good answer / made a good decision / made a correct judgment.

In general, in this sort of context, call = judgment.

CJ
Hi Jim,

Thank YOU for the explanations. I'll use 'good call' in class for my students, and I'll tell them that you thought me this one.

Best regards

TS
Thinking Spainand I'll tell them that you thought taught me this one.
Close, but no cigar! Emotion: smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hi Jim,

Sorry for my mistake. Sometimes, I think one thing, and I write another. There is no excuse though!Emotion: embarrassed

You don't have to be a fortune teller to know that I'm going to ask you about what is the meaning of 'cigar' in the sentence, 'Close, but no cigar!.Emotion: it wasnt me

Thanks in advance

Best Regards

TS
"Close, but no cigar"

1. Close, but not quite.
2. Fall just short of a successful outcome and get nothing for your efforts.

The phrase, and its variant 'nice try, but no cigar', are of US origin and date from the mid-20th century. Fairground stalls gave out cigars as prizes, and this is the most likely source, although there's no definitive evidence to prove that.

Emotion: smile

CJ
Hi Jim,

Thank you for you detailed explanation. One more to my personal folder.

Best regards

TS
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.