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Frances Kemmish typed thus:
Your "infants' school"? Is this a bit of French influence, ... period of time, IIRC), or a BrE-ism, or a Nottsism?

"Infant School" was (maybe still is) the standard term for a school for young children, aged about four to seven years. I looked up my alma mater, the John King Infant School in Pinxton, and it still uses that name.

Still is - entirely common across England and possibly the UK. Infants covers Key Stage 1 to children in Reception (rising 4) and years 1 & 2. Key Stage 2 = Junior = years 3 - 6.

David
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Evan Kirshenbaum filted:
Evan Kirshenbaum wrote on 14 Aug 2004: Like, for whatever ... a lot more of them." That was an appropriate response.

Oh, I got it too, I was just trying to see if there was an interesting discussion here. Counting wars seems to be a tricky business. I would actually have guessed that there were probably fewer wars in that fifty-year stretch than usual.

In the fifty-year stretch before that one, there were only two that anybody remembers...that's got to be some kind of record..r
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When I started school around 1945, nobody else in the ... times 3 is 15; 3 goes into 15 5 times.

Curious. That "goes into" would seem to be a cognate of New York CityE "gazinta", unless it's one of those purely coincidental things.

It struck me the other day when you mentioned it. I think it's the same expression, not a coincidence.
We also had to learn off by heart the 'times tables' up to 12 times 12.

Pretty impressive for 5-year-olds, Doc. We didn't have to memorize "times tables" till third grade, I think. And I don't recall learning about "gazinta" before secondary school.

I was started on some tables, (and taught to read and write) by my parents before I started school. The other kids had to start more or less from scratch at 5. The brighter ones in the A streams would have been expected to have learned them all at about 8 or 9, third/fourth grade / first or second year of junior school. Just like you. We did elementary arithmetic at junior school, before 11, which included division.
That is a good question. All the classes in my infants' school were taught the same way over several years, so I have no idea.

Your "infants' school"? Is this a bit of French influence, Doc (you having lived in France for a substantial period of time, IIRC), or a BrE-ism, or a Nottsism?

Frances and David have covered this. My school was divided into infant, junior and senior sections, the last two being single sex, all within the same complex surrounding its own playing fields (mainly cricket and football for boys; hockey, I suppose, for girls, but we weren't allowed to watch!). We were bussed (separate sexes, separate days) to a local swimming bath for swimming lessons. It was built at the hub of three council house estates in the 1930s, was quite well equipped, and the standard of teachers was high because many of them had been in the services and had taken to teaching after being demobbed. Each year of the senior school was streamed into 4 streams, A to D (A being highest) depending on ability. At any one time there were at least a thousand kids there.
It still exists, as a mixed comprehensive school for pupils from 11 to 16, so there must be a separate sixth form college somewhere around for the 17 to 18s. Probably High Pavement school, which was the grammar school that people passing the 11+ from my area went to, and which is now a 6th form college.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
Curious. That "goes into" would seem to be a cognate of New York CityE "gazinta", unless it's one of those purely coincidental things.

It struck me the other day when you mentioned it. I think it's the same expression, not a coincidence.

I'm not sure, Doc. I really think there's a strong possibility here that it's pure coincidence.
Evan Kirshenbaum filted:

Oh, I got it too, I was just trying to ... were probably fewer wars in that fifty-year stretch than usual.

In the fifty-year stretch before that one, there were only two thatanybody remembers...that's got to be some kind of record..r

Well, I expect quite a few people would remember the Spanish Civil War if you asked them about wars occurring in that period of time. And the other one which comes to my mind, without having done any googling, is the Italian invasion of Ethiopia.
(A friend of mine who was a young woman present during the occupation of Paris by the Germans has told me that her grandmother lived through three wars between the French and the Germans the first one, strictly speaking, involving Prussia).

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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"Times the number by a thousand." Is this construction: (1) Rural/regional? (2) Childish/illiterate? (3) Jargonistic? (4) Pondially differentiated? It came up in a document here at work yesterday and I want to know if I'mout of line to demand it be reworded..r

Well, you know the answer. Even before you asked to be backed up.

The real question is, if you are not supported at work in your demand for it to be reworded, then what do you do? You know, in your heart of hearts, that understanding is slipping out the windows and paper-shuffling is all that is really going on in many of the offices, and it's only a matter of time until the barbarians pull down the gates. (I don't know if this applies only to the company or to the country as a whole.) Is it time to find another way to pay the mortgage, or can you quietly put in your time until retirement? Or do you need to move to a more defensible position? For when the barbarians pull down the gates and start sacking the city. Like, maybe a different city.
Jon Miller
Wife is a maths teacher. When presented with a problem in English, pupils will sometimes ask "Is this a times or a share?"

And she goes, "AAuuugghh!!" But only in the back of her mind. She smiles sweetly and says, "It's a multiplication, dear." Right?

Truly, teachers are grossly underpaid. The problem is, babysitters are grossly overpaid, and we aren't allowed to differentiate.

Jon Miller
On 13 Aug 2004 16:03:51 GMT, CyberCypher
Charles Riggs wrote on 13 Aug 2004:

Holy ***, we obviously need to kill more of them.

No, no, Charles. We don't have to go that far. All we need to do is to develop some kind ... and, voilĂ , fewer plethoras of people and pests everywhere. It's a better solution than Dean Swift's, especially for us vegetarians.

Thanks for that, Franke: one of the best of the day.

Charles Riggs
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But I understand it's still true there's enough food to ... reasons, it's not practicable to get the food to everyone.

ObAUE: That, to my mind, is a terrible abuse of a colon. The second part of the sentence is in ... to a contradiction. A semicolon would have been better. A comma with a "but" would have been best, I think.

When you're right, you're right, Alec, advocate of the colon though I am. Another improvement would be to simply make two sentences out of the one.

Charles Riggs
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