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It's normal, everyday usage, in the UK at least.

Only amongst the illiterate.

Objection your honor...
Also amongEmotion: storm the computer super-literate, particularly found in sub-populations of former Burroughs employees and current or former HP employees. (cf Reverse Polish)

Then also computer gee^H^H^H types who enjoyed
an formal academic education and got to see CAR
and CDR in their dreams.
Jitze
Jitze
R.H. Draney:
"Times the number by a thousand." Is this construction: (1) Rural/regional? (2) Childish/illiterate? (3) Jargonistic? (4) Pondially differentiated?

I'd say either 2 or, on the grounds that you can verb anything and in jargon formation you frequently do, 3. Obviously, Adrian Bailey's experience is different.

Mark Brader, Toronto "As always, breakfast recapitulated (Email Removed) phylogeny." Spider Robinson
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I'm

*Is* it? Not in my experience. Not since my children were very young.

Depends who you mix with, I suppose. I know I'm much more likely to say "times it by five" than "multiply it by five". "Multiply" is jargon. It's like saying "subtract" instead of "take away".

As I do. I have never before thought of "multiply" or "subtract" as jargon. Is this because I am an accountant? Judging by the response to RHD's query I am not entirely alone, but I'd be very interested to hear from more Rightpondians on this.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
I'm Depends who you mix with, I suppose. I know ... is jargon. It's like saying "subtract" instead of "take away".

As I do. I have never before thought of "multiply" or "subtract" as jargon. Is this because I am an accountant?

It is hard for me to consider words learned by every schoolchild jargon.

Mike Nitabach
Laura F Spira typed thus:
I'm Depends who you mix with, I suppose. I know ... is jargon. It's like saying "subtract" instead of "take away".

As I do. I have never before thought of "multiply" or "subtract" as jargon. Is this because I am an accountant? Judging by the response to RHD's query I am not entirely alone, but I'd be very interested to hear from more Rightpondians on this.

Multiply, Divide, Add and Subtract are what I use; Times and Share sound ignorant. I can't think of an equivalent for Add; Take Away is OK as a verb, but horrible as a noun.
Wife is a maths teacher. When presented with a problem in English, pupils will sometimes ask "Is this a times or a share?"

David
==
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Depends who you mix with, I suppose. I know I'm ... is jargon. It's like saying "subtract" instead of "take away".

As I do. I have never before thought of "multiply" or "subtract" as jargon. Is this because I am an accountant? Judging by the response to RHD's query I am not entirely alone, but I'd be very interested to hear from more Rightpondians on this.

You are not alone. What English-speaking child did not learn and use the terms "multiply" and "subtract"? I have never heard anyone say "times it by five," and would not ever expect to hear it from anyone over the age of 8. None of the 11-12 year-olds in the math classes I have taught in Brooklyn ever used such a childish expression, but none of them was named "Adrian Bailey" either.
"Times the number by a thousand." Is this construction: (1) Rural/regional? (2) Childish/illiterate? (3) Jargonistic? (4) Pondially differentiated? It came up in a document here at work yesterday and I want to know if I'm out of line to demand it be reworded..r

I consider it 2, childish/wrong. Assuming they meant "multiply the number by a thousand". I haven't encountered claims of regions or specialties within which it's acceptable.
I suspect the "wrong" usage might be more common in certain rural areas, though.

David Dyer-Bennet, , RKBA: Pics: Dragaera/Steven Brust:
Number 2. (Deffo.)

Yeppo.

Harpo

John Dean
Oxford
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Laura F Spira typed thus:

As I do. I have never before thought of "multiply" ... be very interested to hear from more Rightpondians on this.

Multiply, Divide, Add and Subtract are what I use; Times and Share sound ignorant. I can't think of an equivalent for Add;

'Plus' as in 'Do we plus all these numbers or times them together?'
John Dean
Oxford
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