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In actual fact, as much if not more drinking goes ... the drinking-age laws are not really enforced in college-campus settings.

That's a bit misleading. Any bar in any college town rigorously "cards" patrons.

That's probably true in many and maybe most college towns, sure (probably less so in bigger cities (like, say, New York, where CJ could get served in any bar)).
Drinking is done at private gatherings.

That's what I meant, yes. But this isn't so significant since college life isn't all that 'private' anyway, what with students living in barracks (= EuphAcadAmE 'dorms') or other student-oriented housing.
Here, and in Gainesville (University of Florida) and Tallahassee (Florida State University), fraternities and sororities do no allow drinking on premises. It wasn't allowed at Indiana University in the 50s, either.

What? When I was in college frats were where most of the campus drinking took place. See PCU .
Are you saying that Animal House was not accurate, Coop? What you describe cannot be typical.
Aren't the frats typically private property, owned or rented by the fraternity organizations in question? How can a university regulate drinking within, if so?
Under-age students drink, but drinking-age laws are vigorously enforced.

If they were so vigorously enforced, then how is it that underage students drink?
It struck me the other day when you mentioned it. I think it's the same expression, not a coincidence.

You wouldn't want to get it confused with a "gazunder" though.

Yes. Gazunders were common when I were a lad. In our modern, up to date (at least in the early 1930s when it was built) council house, plumbing was limited to the ground floor. We had a bathroom (which just contained a bath and hand basin) indoors next to the kitchen, but the lavatory was outside the back door. It was a long, dark, cold trip downstairs for a pee in the winter.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
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(2) All parties at which alcohol was served were required to also serve "equally attractive non-alcholic beverages", which became known as EANABs (/'i n&bz/).

When I was in college, this policy applied only to parties that were sort of 'official' in the sense that they used college money (I guess there was some sort of fund you could get party money from). Most parties were unofficial, I believe.
I don't think the non-alcoholic beverages had to be 'equally attractive', but they had to be available.
Not any more. The usual drill is that some fraternity has a party, someone gets drunk and injured (or dies) or some coed gets "raped", and the university pulls the charter of the fraternity. All the other fraternities then ban drinking in the house.
It wasn't "Animal House" in the 50s, either. There wasn't any in-house drinking at IU in the 50s. By that, I mean no parties with drinking. We had small refrigerators in our rooms, and drank a beer now and then, but drinking parties were held off-campus.

I never saw an "Animal House" type party at IU...ever. I went to a Homecoming party at my son's fraternity at University of Alabama and was surprised to see a keg in the basement. They kept things pretty much under control, though.
Aren't the frats typically private property, owned or rented by the fraternity organizations in question? How can a university regulate drinking within, if so?

The fraternity or sorority is on campus at the grace of the university. The university can pull their charter at any time. Laws regarding serving minors apply to private residences as well as bars. If the police come, and find minors being served, they'll arrest anyone serving them. Usually, a fraternity officer is arrested.

The biggest problem on a campus today is fake IDs. Half the students have computers and computer programs that put out fakes that are better than Hogan's Heros fake documentation. Go to any campus bar hangout in any city and the guy on the door will have a stack of confiscated fake IDs a couple of inches thick.
Under-age students drink, but drinking-age laws are vigorously enforced.

If they were so vigorously enforced, then how is it that underage students drink?

Jeezus, Areff, you ever drive over the posted speed limit? Students drink because they don't think they'll get caught.
The average number of credit hours to graduate is probably ... math course, but they're taking some course in that area.

I'm not sure how prevalent this sort of system is, Coop, at least as you've described it. What can be ... rid of all this sort of thing, and then in the '80s there was a movement in the other direction.

I'm not in the field, so my information may be bogus. However, the university I went to, and the universities my two children attended, had similar system.
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Jeezus, Areff, you ever drive over the posted speed limit?

I always do, Coop. Skitt, why have I never gotten a ticket? I try not to drive more than 15mph over the posted limit.
I'd do the Arjay thing and use cruise control, but I never bothered to read that section of the manual.
Students drink because they don't think they'll get caught.

Or, in some places, cot.
(2) All parties at which alcohol was served were required to also serve "equally attractive non-alcholic beverages", which became known as EANABs (/'i n&bz/).

When I was in college, this policy applied only to parties that were sort of 'official' in the sense that they used college money (I guess there was some sort of fund you could get party money from). Most parties were unofficial, I believe.

At Stanford I think it was pretty much any party that was "advertised" (in some sense) as a party. There was no "college money" to be had, but there were house dues, and different dorms I lived in made different decisions about whether dues were used for alcohol or whether there was a separate, optional, pot that you were supposed to contribute to if you were going to partake. (This wasn't so much out of prudishness as that alcohol for parties tended to be one of the largest line items (if not the largest) in a dorm's budget, and splitting it out substantially lowered dues for people who didn't plan on attending parties.)
I don't think the non-alcoholic beverages had to be 'equally attractive', but they had to be available.

The "equally attractive" was intended to preclude people from just pointing to the water fountain down the hall. Typically, it meant Coke (or the like) or non-alcoholic versions of whatever punches or mixed drinks were being served.

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Note that "freshman" and (less often) "sophomore" generalize by analogy ... someone might be a "freshman senator" or a "sophomore congressman".

Or first or second term of service, of whatever length - a "sophomore congressman" isn't in his second year, but in his second term and third or fourth year, right?

I think it could go either way.
(California, unusually, doesn't have one, since our two senators were ... serving the last two years of a senator who resigned.)

How was it decided which one would get the shortened term?

It was specified on the ballot. Pete Wilson was elected for a six-year term (his second) in 1988, but became governor in 1991. He was replaced by John Seymour, who served until the next senatorial election (in 1992) and then ran against Feinstein for the remainder of Wilson's term. Feinstein won, and then was reelected in 1994 and
2000. Boxer defeated Bruce Herschensohn for the seat that was due tocome up in 1992 and was reelected in 1998.

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My quoting was possibly too generous; I was speaking about the fact that physics majors in the US generally take ... instead of math professors. I didn't mean to indicate that the entire courseload was the same, just the math portion.

That wasn't the case in my school at all. Math courses were taught exclusively by the math department. There were some physics courses that were largely math.
Brian Rodenborn
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