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Aaron J. Dinkin filted:
Note that "freshman" and (less often) "sophomore" generalize by analogy ... someone might be a "freshman senator" or a "sophomore congressman".

Or first or second term of service, of whatever length - a "sophomore congressman" isn't in his second year, but in his second term and third or fourth year, right?

The metaphor gets extended even farther than that...the amount of time that passes between a band's first and second albums is largely irrelevant, but the second album is called their "sophomore effort"...sometimes it works, sometimes it merely points up that they only had one good album in them (the Knack's "But The Little Girls Understand" stands as an example of the latter)..r
How was it decided which one would get the shortened term?

It was specified on the ballot. Pete Wilson was elected for a six-year term (his second) in 1988, but became ... Boxer defeated Bruce Herschensohn for the seat that was due to come up in 1992 and was reelected in 1998.

I guess what I mean is, how was it decided which would be on the ballot for which? I mean, did Dianne Feinstein wake up one morning and say, "I would like to run for the U.S. Senate," but Barbara Boxer said to her, "Sorry, my friend, I'm already running for that seat; but there's a very nice abbreviated term that you could run for if you like." Or did Feinstein come in second in the primary? Or did Feinstein just decide from the beginning that she would rather run for the two-year term than the six-year term?
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
No, "reading" or "doing" would seem to describe the UK ... some sort of emphasis on the subject being "Majored" in.

I think that's precisely it. I don't know the history of 'majoring' and such, but I believe it started out ... or even two closely related subjects. The idea is that you'd be too narrow and unedumucated if you did that.

Yebbut, I joined the marketing side of IBM, not the R&D side. I had interviews with several large multinationals which were hiring people straight from university, and I got the impression that it was the level of the qualification, rather than the subject, that was the entrance ticket to the company in the case of jobs that were not in research. They would then provide the training necessary for the job one had been hired for. It took me (and others) two further years of education and on-the-job training to get promoted from associate to full systems engineer.

OTOH, my friend who joined the brain-drain was hired as a physicist and went straight into a laboratory, where he was productive almost from day one, working on electronic devices that were similar to the ones he'd done his PhD on.
I don't think that anyone who had made the decision to take a PhD in physics after completing a degree, or who had deliberately gone to law or medical school, would say that they'd been 'forced' to become physicists, lawyers or doctors - except, of course, where those professions were a family tradition, and where eldest children were expected to follow in parents' footsteps.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
How was it decided which one would get the shortened term?

It was specified on the ballot.

It occurs to me that you may have meant "How did the Democrats decide which candidate to run in which race?" That one I can't answer,

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >English is about as pure as a
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >cribhouse ***. We don't justPalo Alto, CA 94304 >borrow words; on occasion, English
I never saw an "Animal House" type party at IU...ever. I went to a Homecoming party at my son's fraternity at University of Alabama and was surprised to see a keg in the basement. They kept things pretty much under control, though.

You've lived a sheltered life.

Charles Riggs
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Andrew Gwilliam premed:
It struck me the other day when you mentioned it. I think it's the same expression, not a coincidence.

You wouldn't want to get it confused with a "gazunder" though.

Or with what gazinta a gazunder.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
You wouldn't want to get it confused with a "gazunder" though.

Or with what gazinta a gazunder.

Eek!

Andrew Gwilliam
To email me, replace "bottomless pit" with "silverhelm"
It was specified on the ballot. Pete Wilson was elected ... to come up in 1992 and was reelected in 1998.

I guess what I mean is, how was it decided which would be on the ballot for which? I mean, ... did Feinstein just decide from the beginning that she would rather run for the two-year term than the six-year term?

Yes to the last question. Feinstein had hoped to avoid a primary contest by running for the two-year term against John Seymour (who had been appointed by Pete Wilson after Wilson gave up his Senate seat to become governor). The primary for the six-year term was supposed to be more heavily contested, since it was for an open seat (vacated by Alan Cranston's retirement). As it turned out, Feinstein got a primary battle anyway, against none other than future governor Gray Davis (then State Controller), who ran some nasty ads comparing Feinstein to Leona Helmsley. (Feinstein had apparently forgiven Davis by the time he was facing recall last year, as she was one of his staunchest defenders.)
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No, "reading" or "doing" would seem to describe the UK ... some sort of emphasis on the subject being "Majored" in.

I think that's precisely it. I don't know the history of 'majoring' and such, but I believe it started out ... you're forced to be a physicist unless you're lucky enough to get a job at IBM like Doc Robin did.

The accountancy profession in the UK is a voracious devourer of graduates, and takes a lot of people with degrees in things like Physics. A lot of science graduates used to go into IT work as well, though that may have changed with the recent slump in IT jobs. So pepole with Physics degrees aren't forced to become physicists. In fact the general situation in the UK is that employers tend to prefer "traditional" degree subjects rather than the more obviously vocational ones.
Matthew Huntbach
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