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Andrew Gwilliam premed:

You wouldn't want to get it confused with a "gazunder" though.

Or with what gazinta a gazunder.

Or whether a canopy goes over or under the bed.

Ray
Students drink because they don't think they'll get caught.

Or, in some places, cot.

I saw somebody on some Web message board write "but it was all for not" yesterday.
JM
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Andrew Gwilliam premed: Or with what gazinta a gazunder.

Or whether a canopy goes over or under the bed.

Even one py and I toss and turn. CDB
Even with a four-year undergraduate degree, rather than three, would studying physics and maths for only half of the time enable someone with a good class of degree to enter straight into a PhD program, or would they be expected to do an MSc first?

Entering straight into a PhD program is frequently done - for instance, one of my roommates majored in Chemistry and Physics and entered a PhD program in physics directly. (Nearly two thirds of his undergraduate coursework was in math, physics, and chemistry, however - more than was required.) The typical PhD program, however, is a five-year affair, with an optional Master's after the second year for doing somewhat more work; are they more likely to be separate programs Over There.
I mean, gosh, I entered into a PhD program in linguistics without any additional coursework (though a year after completing my AB), and less than a quarter of my undergraduate coursework was in linguistics.

-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
CB filted:
Or whether a canopy goes over or under the bed.

Even one py and I toss and turn. CDB

Odd...and I can't get to sleep at all unless I've had one..r
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In fact the general situation in the UK is that employers tend to prefer "traditional" degree subjects rather than the more obviously vocational ones.

That used to be true of the US too, but there's been a degree of Cooperation (NTTAWWC).
The accountancy profession in the UK is a voracious devourer of graduates, and takes a lot of people with degrees ... situation in the UK is that employers tend to prefer "traditional" degree subjects rather than the more obviously vocational ones.

Sure. My brother-in-law did his D.Phil in Physics in his case more specifically laser-engineering, and he made a genuine contribution but became a merchant banker. A mate after "Greats" (Oxford-speak for Classics) now fat-cats it on the Baltic Exchange. My sister did English and went to the top grade of the Civil Service. Unless I'm out of date, don't do Media Studies if you want to get into the BBC, or Journalism and Criminology if you want to write Times leaders.

I have a nasty feeling that in spite of university status for all higher education in UK, the straight subjects still make you, in military terms, a commissioned officer, while the fancy combinations will probably consign most people to at best warrant-officer grades for life. Maybe I'm wrong to think of this as a "nasty feeling"; but at least the old arrangements let you know what was what from the outset. I've got a lot of time for the old flexible HNC/HND/CNAA system: it was good. Don't even get me started on the shocking system we now have for training nurses.
Mike.
CB filted:

Even one py and I toss and turn. CDB

Odd...and I can't get to sleep at all unless I've had one..r

AOK, once you get it back in the can. CDB
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Areff wibbled

Why would "semester" be a baffling term (so to say) ... institutions, including some often mentioned by AUErs (UMIST, Oxford Brookes).

But AIUI semesters in the USA don't come two to the year. OBU's do,=20 at least. I've never found 'semester' ... summer school, and the strange=20 social hierarchy found in US school stories/films either confused me=20 or I skipped over it.=20

To quote Stephen Fry "I wouldn't know a Sophomore from a Grade Point=20 Average".=20
Actually, after five years in the US, I probably do know the difference,=20 but I doubt I could distinguish between an Unofficial Transcript and a=20 Summa Cum Laud=E6(a,ae,?), and I once got a terrible flaming on usenet for=

failing to spot the distinction between a Junior High School and a High=20 School.=20
=20
Colin Rosenthal Sabbagh's Second Law: The biggest problem with=20 communication is the illusion that it has occurred.
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