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Adrian Bailey wrote on 13 Aug 2004:
More strawman rhetoric. Give it a rest, fellas.

That's a good line after you've talked yourself into an indefensible corner. As you must be aware, I agree that most speakers and writers are sloppy and illiterate in their everyday usages as well as their attempts at formal usages. I don't agree that most use childspeak when talking about high-tech stuff like addition, subtraction, division, and multiplication though. Telling my son to memorize the "times tables" is a far cry from telling him to ?"times this number by that number". The former is s short word used because he's only 8 and uses Chinese and Taiwanese for 99.9% of his conversation everyday, so "multiplication" is probably not in his vocabulary, but "multiply" is.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
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"Be fruitful and multiply".
As you must be aware, I agree that most speakers and writers are sloppy and illiterate in their everyday usages ... Chinese and Taiwanese for 99.9% of his conversation everyday, so "multiplication" is probably not in his vocabulary, but "multiply" is.

You have your experience, I have mine. Like a great many British people I use "times" as a verb and don't even consider it "childspeak", even though that it is of course what it originally was. Blame the educationalists.

Adrian
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You have your experience, I have mine. Like a great many British people I use "times" as a verb and don't even consider it "childspeak", even though that it is of course what it originally was. Blame the educationalists.

But what do you use as the past tense or gerund? Timesed? Timesing?

And why do no dictionaries recognise this usage, if it's so widespread?
You have your experience, I have mine. Like a great ... is of course what it originally was. Blame the educationalists.

But what do you use as the past tense or gerund? Timesed? Timesing?

Yes.
And why do no dictionaries recognise this usage, if it's so widespread?

Ask them.
Adrian
But what do you use as the past tense or gerund? Timesed? Timesing?

Yes.

OK well that's just sounds plain silly to me. I'm pretty damn sure I've never heard anyone say either.
It does get a few interesting google hits (half of them arguing about whether it is correct or not).
And why do no dictionaries recognise this usage, if it's so widespread?

Ask them.

Well I'm not so convinced it is that widespread, or if it, it must be a very recent phenomenon. But people have being multiplying for thousands of years (hence the fact that there are now over 6 billion of us). I do however feel that it is the job of dictionaries to at least mention questionable but reasonably common usages.
This one seems to be (just) common enough to be listed.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
...
} If you're a New York City mathematics teacher then perhaps you also know } "gazinta" (I've heard it claimed that "gazinta" is unique to New York math } teachers, but I've seen some evidence that it, or something similar, is } found generally in AmE.
Jack Record used it teaching us math in eleventh grade (trigonometry and something else, maybe analytic geometry). I've used it ever since.

He used it about how Jack Nicholson would use it, like in The Shining .

R. J. Valentine
Dylan Nicholson wrote on 13 Aug 2004:
(...
But people have being multiplying for thousands of years (hence the fact that there are now over 6 billion of us).

I saw a grisly (by 1950s' standards) scifi movie in which Leo G Carroll's character tells someone that "there are now 2 billion people in the world, and by the year 2050, there will be 3.5 billion". We must have also been dividing and splitting like shares of stock for the past
50 years or so.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
You have your experience, I have mine. Like a great ... is of course what it originally was. Blame the educationalists.

When I started school around 1945, nobody else in the class of 5-year-olds could read or write, or do any figuring. They got taught elementary arithmetic in the fashion: 1 plus 2 is three; 5 take away 3 is 2; 5 times 3 is 15; 3 goes into 15 5 times. We also had to learn off by heart the 'times tables' up to 12 times 12. The one new to me (and thus of a later generation) was David56's 'share'.
But what do you use as the past tense or gerund? Timesed? Timesing?

Teacher: How did you make 15 from 5 and 3? Pupil: I timesed them. And so on. The addition, subtraction, division and multiplication words were introduced and understood by the time the kids got to junior school at around 8.
And why do no dictionaries recognise this usage, if it's so widespread?

That is a good question. All the classes in my infants' school were taught the same way over several years, so I have no idea. 'Times' and 'timesed' do not appear in COD10, but baby speech such as 'dada' does.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
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When I started school around 1945, nobody else in the class of 5-year-olds could read or write, or do any ... 2 is three; 5 take away 3 is 2; 5 times 3 is 15; 3 goes into 15 5 times.

Curious. That "goes into" would seem to be a cognate of New York CityE "gazinta", unless it's one of those purely coincidental things.
We also had to learn off by heart the 'times tables' up to 12 times 12.

Pretty impressive for 5-year-olds, Doc. We didn't have to memorize "times tables" till third grade, I think. And I don't recall learning about "gazinta" before secondary school.
That is a good question. All the classes in my infants' school were taught the same way over several years, so I have no idea.

Your "infants' school"? Is this a bit of French influence, Doc (you having lived in France for a substantial period of time, IIRC), or a BrE-ism, or a Nottsism?
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