"Times the number by a thousand."
Is this construction:
(1) Rural/regional?
(2) Childish/illiterate?
(3) Jargonistic?
(4) Pondially differentiated?
It came up in a document here at work yesterday and I want to know if I'm out of line to demand it be reworded..r
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"Times the number by a thousand." Is this construction: (1) Rural/regional? (2) Childish/illiterate? (3) Jargonistic? (4) Pondially differentiated? It came up in a document here at work yesterday and I want to know if I'm out of line to demand it be reworded..r

Number 2. (Deffo.)

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
"Times the number by a thousand." Is this construction: (1) ... if I'm out of line to demand it be reworded..r

Number 2. (Deffo.)

Yeppo.

Mike Nitabach
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
"Times the number by a thousand." Is this construction: (1) Rural/regional? (2) Childish/illiterate? (3) Jargonistic? (4) Pondially differentiated? It came up in a document here at work yesterday and I want to know if I'm out of line to demand it be reworded..r

I'll vote for 2, with the "childish" suboption.

rzed
And let us not forget gazintas.
"Times the number by a thousand." Is this construction: (1) Rural/regional? (2) Childish/illiterate? (3) Jargonistic? (4) Pondially differentiated? It came up in a document here at work yesterday and I want to know if I'mout of line to demand it be reworded..r

It's normal, everyday usage, in the UK at least. It's probably not formal enough for your document though, so just change "times" to "multiply".

Adrian
*Is* it? Not in my experience. Not since my children were very young.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
It's normal, everyday usage, in the UK at least.

Only amongst the illiterate.
R.
out of It's normal, everyday usage, in the UK at least.

*Is* it? Not in my experience. Not since my children were very young.

Depends who you mix with, I suppose. I know I'm much more likely to say "times it by five" than "multiply it by five". "Multiply" is jargon. It's like saying "subtract" instead of "take away".
Adrian
"Multiply" is jargon. It's like saying "subtract" instead of "take away".

No it isn't. Do tell us why the everyday word "multiply" is jargon.

This smacks of reverse snobbery gone mad.
R.
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