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can someone take a look please its for a student, same old, need someone to take a look, i've tried to correct punctuation and grammar...

He had sagged his pants so much , his pants were dropped to his knees. OK
He's willing to meet any of them/anyone of them. BOTH
I've lost my phone when I've been drunk/when I was drunk. I don't know
Her feet are weird, there is a big size difference between her pinky and biggest toe OK but I don't know if one would understand????
He got a tattoo over his muscles; he outlined his muscle with the tatoo to accentuate the muscle (as in the tattoo takes the exact shape of the muscle to accentuate it) how would you say that????
If the cab gets here now, we wouldn't have had much time to talk NO we won't have had ...
until when is he gone? I don't know if that's correct
I'd forget my Spanish way before I forgot my French. NO way before I'd forget my French
She's more of the snobbish type, everytime she gets a chance to flaunt it, she does. OK
Her voice message last over/more than 3 minutes. BOTH
What kind of music do you think I listen? OK
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I see you're making a little bit of progress in the capitalization and punctuation department, Alc. Congrats.

My comments are in the quote:
alc24He had sagged his pants so much , his pants were dropped to his knees. OK No. I might suggest this: His pants were so saggy that they dropped to his knees.
He's willing to meet any of them/anyone any one of them. BOTH
I've lost my phone when I've been drunk/when I was drunk. I don't know
1. I lost my phone when I was drunk. -- This refers to one specific past occasion.
2. I've lost my phone when I've been drunk. -- This is much more general, and it is possible that the drunken loss of a phone has happened more than once.
3. I've lost my phone when I was drunk. -- (same as #2)
Her feet are weird. There is a big size difference between her pinky and biggest toe. OK but I don't know if one would understand????
He got a tattoo over his muscles; he outlined his muscle with the tatoo to accentuate the muscle (as in the tattoo takes the exact shape of the muscle to accentuate it) how would you say that?? He got tattoos that accentuated his muscles.
If the cab gets here now, we wouldn't have had much time to talk NO we won't have had ...
Until when is he gone? I don't know if that's correct Possible, but not particularly elegant. It would be better to say "How long will he be gone?" or "When will he be back?"
I'd forget my Spanish way before I forgot my French. NO way before I'd forget my French
She's more of the snobbish type. Every time everytime she gets a chance to flaunt it, she does. OK The word "it" is fine. It would presumably refer back to something in the previous sentence. Without the word "it", then I would not use "flaunt". I might use something such as "show off" instead. (The verb "flaunt" is transitive.)
Her voice message lasted over/more than 3 minutes. BOTH
What kind of music do you think I listen to? OK

Comments  
He had sagged his pants so much, they were dropped to his knees. -- Superfluous space before the comma. This transitive use of "sag" is a little unusual.

He's willing to meet any of them/any one of them.

I've lost my phone when I've been drunk. -- It's happened on one or more occasions.

I lost my phone when I was drunk. -- It happened on the specific occasion I'm talking about.

Her feet are weird. There is a big size difference between her pinky and biggest toe. -- Comma splice. It's a strange comparison, and I'm not sure it makes sense or why it would be "weird".

He got tattooed /got a tattoo to highlight his muscles.

If the cab gets here now, we wouldn't have had much time to talk until when is he gone? -- Doesn't make any sense to me.

I'd forget my Spanish way before I forgot / I'd forget my French.

She's more of the snobbish type. Every time she gets a chance to flaunt it, she does. -- Comma splice. Flaunt what?

Her voice message lasted over/more than three minutes. -- Except in casual writing, small numbers are best written out in full.

What kind of music do you think I listen to?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
just making sure

  • He's willing to meet any of them/any one of them. BOTH ARE RIGHT HERE
  • If the cab gets here now, we wouldn't have had much time to talk (a typo , 2 differnt sentences)
  • Until when is he gone?
  • I'd forget my Spanish way before I forgot / I'd forget my French (which one would it be here?)
thank you
 Yankee's reply was promoted to an answer.
He's willing to meet any of them/any one of them. BOTH ARE RIGHT HERE -- Yes.

If the cab gets here now, we won't have had much time to talk.

Until when is he gone? -- Not very natural. You can say "How long will he be gone?"

I'd forget my Spanish way before I forgot / I'd forget my French. -- Both sound OK to me. There's little perceptible difference in meaning.
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