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Thanx Einde for help! Below is a sentence.
* John had a go at his neighbour for trying it on with his wife.*

I know the meaning of every word in above sentence but I could gather the meaning of the sentence. Please help me.
Thanx/NSP
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
Thanx Einde for help. Below is a sentence. * John had a go at his neighbour I know the meaning of every word in above sentence but I could gather the meaning of the sentence. Please help me.

John attacked his neighbour (either verbally or physically).

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
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n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
Thanx Einde for help! Below is a sentence. * John had a go at his neighbour for trying it on with his wife.* I know the meaning of every word in above sentence but I could gather the meaning of the sentence. Please help me.

John attacked his neighbour (probably verbally) for flirting with his wife.

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Thanx. What is about doing in the sentence below?

* I can just about make him out.*
Regards/NSP
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
Thanx. What is about doing in the sentence below? * I can just about make him out.*

I can recognise him, but with difficulty, e.g. on a blurred photo, or on a phote of a large group. It could also refer to someone in the far distance.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
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Thanx. What is the best book/technique to sharpen skills in such type of English?
Regards/NSP
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
Thanx. What is the best book/technique to sharpen skills in such type of English?

I don't think there is really any book that is guaranteed to be of use with such idiomatic phrases. A good dictionary of idioms might help.

Reading books - particularly if there is a good translation into your own language with which you can compare the bits you don't understand - can also be helpful - but with some books in translation, I must admit, I get the impression that the translator didn't quite understand an idiom properly.
Watching movies in English, perhaps with undertitles in your own language, can be helpful if you have no great difficulties understanding the spoken language.
Living in a country where English is spoken is also useful for picking up idiomatic language.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
In one of the grammar books I found the following: * She told me that you'hv just been taken on ... follows: * She told me that you had been taken on by one of the biggest bank in the City.

My take is that both are possible.
You have been taken on prior to the moment that I am speaking with you (now)
You had been taken on prior to the moment when I spoke with her (at that moment in the past).
Karen
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Consider the following sentence:
* I was put off the idea of travelling through jungles; my brother picked up malaria in that way.
Why is it *I was put off ..*? Why not *I put off ..*?

Thanx/NSP
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