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n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
Consider the following sentence: * I was put off the idea of travelling through jungles; my brother picked up malaria in that way. Why is it *I was put off ..*? Why not *I put off ..*?

"I was put off ..." means "I was dissuaded ..." whereas "I put off ..." means "I postponed ..."
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:> Consider the following sentence:

* I was put off the idea of travelling through ... was put off ..*? Why not *I put off ..*?

"I was put off ..." means "I was dissuaded ..." whereas "I put off ..." means "I postponed ..."

Thanx. Then it should be like * I was put off by the idea..*

Why *by* has not been used?
Thanx and regards
NSP
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On Mar 2, 8:08 pm, Einde O'Callaghan Consider the following sentence:
* I was put off the idea of travelling through ... was put off ..*? Why not *I put off ..*?

"I was put off ..." means "I was dissuaded ..." whereas "I put off ..." means "I postponed ..."

Thanx. Then it should be like * I was put off by the idea..*

Why *by* has not been used?
Thanx and regards
NSP
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
n o s p a m p l e a ... ..." whereas "I put off ..." means "I postponed ..."

Thanx. Then it should be like * I was put off by the idea..* Why *by* has not been used?

Perhaps I should have been clearer. It wasn't the idea that put the speaker off, rather the the speaker was dissuaded FROM doing something, in this case, "I was dissuaded from travelling through the jungle."

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Which of the following is correct?
* I am clueless what this difference might be due to. * I am clueless what to this difference might be due. * I am clueless to what this difference might be due.

Thanx/NSP
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n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
Which of the following is correct? * I am clueless what this difference might be due to. * I am clueless what to this difference might be due. * I am clueless to what this difference might be due.

I'm clueless about what the difference is due to.
But his is clumysy. If I had to use the word "clueless" I'd say "I'm clueless about the reason for the difference."
More naturally I'd say "I haven't a clue why they're (or: these things are) different." This is an idiomatic use of "haven't" that I wouldn't teach in class as this usage is largely obsolete now except in the phrase "I haven't a clue".
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
* It's time we were off; it's getting on.
What is the meaning of the above sentence?
Thanx/NSP
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
* It's time we were off; it's getting on. What is the meaning of the above sentence?

It's time for us to go, it's getting late.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
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Are the following sentences grammatically correct?

* I will be more than happy to ..
* He is a first class first student.
Thanx
NSP
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