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n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
Are the following sentences grammatically correct? * I will be more than happy to ..

This sentence is OK, but most people would probably more often say "I would be more than happy to ..."
* He is a first class first student.

I'm not sure what you are trying to say but it feels wrong to me - BTW it should be "first-class" since it is a compound adjective, i.e. one concept made up of 2 words.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:

Are the following sentences grammatically correct? * I will be more than happy to ..

This sentence is OK, but most people would probably more often say "I would be more than happy to ..."

Your alternative is used in a slightly different context though.

E.g.
I WILL be more than happy to give you a refund if you CAN show proof of purchase.
I WOULD be more than happy to give you a refund if you COULD show proof of purchase.
I think. Non-native English speakers come up with really tough questions.
BFN. Paul.
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Paul Edwards schrieb:
n o s p a m p l e a ... often say "I would be more than happy to ..."

Your alternative is used in a slightly different context though. E.g. I WILL be more than happy to give you ... a refund if you COULD show proof of purchase. I think. Non-native English speakers come up with really tough questions.

I was thinking of a different context (a higher level of politeness), e.g.

Old lady asks young man: "Can you help me with this suitcase, please?"

Young man to old lady as he takes the suitcase: "I'd be more than happy to help you."
You're right about tough questions. I come across this every day in my work as an English teacher.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Paul Edwards schrieb:

Your alternative is used in a slightly different context though. ... think. Non-native English speakers come up with really tough questions.

I was thinking of a different context (a higher level of politeness), e.g. Old lady asks young man: "Can you help me with this suitcase, please?" Young man to old lady as he takes the suitcase: "I'd be more than happy to help you."

Well, although that is common usage, it is technically incorrect. That statement technically should require a disclaimer:

I'd be more than happy to help you BUT I'm allergic to suitcases.

The technically correct version would be:
I'm more than happy to help you.
The original use of "will" would be:
I will be happy to help you AFTER I make a short phone call.

But again, the technically incorrect "would" can be substituted here too.
And anyhow, if we're talking politeness, "delighted" is more usual than "happy".
All this is caveated with "I think". :-)
You're right about tough questions. I come across this every day in my work as an English teacher.

I'm sure glad I don't have to learn this language! I think children should learn it as a dual mother tongue so that they don't need to really learn it.
BFN. Paul.
Thanx Einde and Paul for earlier help.
I read somewhere as follows:
* If a 400 kg person sits on you, they will crush you.

My question is why it is they and why not he or she. I tried to understand but couldn't figure out.
They is plural and it is referring to person which is singular.

Thanx/NSP
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Thanx Einde and Paul for earlier help. I read somewhere as follows: * If a 400 kg person sits on ... I tried to understand but couldn't figure out. They is plural and it is referring to person which is singular.

Well, technically it should be "he/she" rather than "they". But "he/she" is a bit cumbersome. So in these sorts of situations, "he" is often used. But "they", although technically incorrect, is also often used (which makes it correct by definition, since English is defined by common usage). The basic problem is that there is no gender-neutral word in English. You can say that English is a sexist language. Maybe not as bad as French where every object in the world needs to be arbitrarily made male or female and get a "le" or "la" put in front of it.
BFN. Paul.
Well, technically it should be "he/she" rather than "they". But "he/she" is a bit cumbersome. So in these sorts of ... although technically incorrect, is also often used (which makes it correct by definition, since English is defined by common usage).

Oh, and rarely, a feminazi will throw in "she" instead of "he" or "they" in that circumstance, and stuff up the comprehension, because you wonder if you missed something that made it clear that the person in question was female, or that perhaps this piece of information is only applicable to women. It's bloody annoying. It's not the men of today's fault that the language has no gender-neutral term. Given that English is my MOTHER tongue, if women have any complaints with the language they can take it up with my mother. My father was presumably too busy delivering mail to talk to me in English anyway.
BFN. Paul.
Paul Edwards schrieb:
Paul Edwards schrieb: I was thinking of a different context ... the suitcase: "I'd be more than happy to help you."

Well, although that is common usage, it is technically incorrect. That statement technically should require a disclaimer:

I disagree. It's a question of using distancing (in this case a tense shift) to achieve a higher level of politiness.
Regards, Einde O'callaghan
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n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
Thanx Einde and Paul for earlier help. I read somewhere as follows: * If a 400 kg person sits on ... I tried to understand but couldn't figure out. They is plural and it is referring to person which is singular.

In modern conversational English the pronoun "they" is often used to refer back to impersonal constructions (a person, somebody and similar constructions), even if technically gthe original construction is singular.

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
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