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n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:

* He is a first class first student.

I'm not sure what you are trying to say but it feels wrong to me - BTW it should be "first-class" since it is a compound adjective, i.e. one concept made up of 2 words.

My US educated professor used to often use first class first student. I wanted to investigate if it is correct or incorrect to say so.
Thanx
NSP
n o s p a m p l e a ... compound adjective, i.e. one concept made up of 2 words.

My US educated professor used to often use first class first student. I wanted to investigate if it is correct or incorrect to say so. Thanx NSP

Too bad you did not ask the prof at the time. He was indulging in wordplay.
first class means high marks but first also means from the start.

first class first student could mean the student is dedicated to being first class/getting high marks from the start
but first class is also the top luxury in travel
so the prof may have meant the student wanted to
always go first class but was more interested in that than actually working for it
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My US educated professor used to often use *first class ... it is correct or incorrect to say so. Thanx NSP

Too bad you did not ask the prof at the time. He was indulging in wordplay. first class means high ... start. first class first student could mean the student is dedicated to being first class/getting high marks from the start

I would reword that and say:
first class first student could mean the student is dedicated to being first class/getting high marks AS HIS HIGHEST PRIORITY.
But yeah, you have to ask the prof for clarification. It is not proper English (as in, understandable to another English speaker).
BFN. Paul.
On 13 Feb 2007 in the message
In one of the grammar books I found the following: * She told me that you'hv just been taken on ... the City. Please advise why they have used the present perfect in the second sentence and why NOT past perfect.

The main error that the book seems to be inviting you to detect is the singular "bank", which should be the plural "banks". (I assume that the book doesn't say "you'hv".)
But I would love to know which of the "grammar books" you're talking about.

Aybeecee
On 13 Feb 2007 in the message The main error that the book seems to be inviting you to detect is the singular "bank", which should be the plural "banks". (I assume that the book doesn't say "you'hv".)

It is banks only and I made mistake while typing.
But I would love to know which of the "grammar books" you're talking about.

Practical Everyday English Steven Colins ISBN 91-646-1481-6

NSP
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Which is the better construction?
* I do not know anyone there to be able to speak to him. * I do not know anyone there who I can speak to.
Thanx
NSP
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
Which is the better construction? * I do not know anyone there to be able to speak to him. * I do not know anyone there who I can speak to.

The second one is correct English and the first isn't - although it would be understood (more or less).
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Someone who knows better English than I, wrote me as follows:

* It truly is a wonderful place to live and work.
I feel it should be as follows:
* It is truly a wonderful place to live and work.
Which is a better construction?
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n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
Someone who knows better English than I, wrote me as follows: * It truly is a wonderful place to live and work. I feel it should be as follows: * It is truly a wonderful place to live and work. Which is a better construction?

The second is the neutral position of the adverb, however the first is more emphatic.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
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