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Suppose I am sending a mail to 10 people and I am requesting each one of them to write me if anyone of them happen to my city. How do I do it?
* I would love to meet you/all of you/anyone of you/every one of you/ if you/all of you/anyone of you/every one of you/ happen to XYZ.

What should I have at the first place and the second place in the above sentence?
NSP
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
Suppose I am sending a mail to 10 people and I am requesting each one of them to write me ... happen to XYZ. What should I have at the first place and the second place in the above sentence? NSP

I would rephrase it:
If any of you should ever come to XYZ, I'd love to meet you, so let me know if you are coming.
Or perhaps something like: I'd love to meet all of you (or: you all) some day, and if any of you should ever come to XYZ, please let me know.

The second one seems better to me.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
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* I would like to strength my acquaintance with each one of you.

How would a native speaker write above?
Thanx/NSP
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
* I would like to strength my acquaintance with each one of you. How would a native speaker write above?

I'd like to get to know all of you better.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
A) I am satisfied.
B) I am quite satisfied.
I am told B means less satisfied as compared to A. Is this correct?

Regards/NSP
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"Upto". How should it be written i.e. as "upto" or "up to"? I guess both are correct but gmail's spell check shows "upto" as wrong.
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
"Upto". How should it be written i.e. as "upto" or "up to"? I guess both are correct but gmail's spell check shows "upto" as wrong.

Two separate words - "upto" is never correct.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
A) I am satisfied. B) I am quite satisfied. I am told B means less satisfied as compared to A. Is this correct?

I would use either to mean the same thing.
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Which is the better construction? * I do not know anyone there to be able to speak to him. * I do not know anyone there who I can speak to.

The latter, however it is not usual to finish a sentence with a preposition. If I wrote this sentence, I would probably write "I do not know anyone there to whom I can speak". However, that way of writing is probably considered to be rather old fashioned these days
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