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* He was going off to night school when he saw a firework lying *in* the road.
In a book titled "Practical Everyday English Steven Colins ISBN 91-646-1481-6", I found the above sentence. Why should it be in*? I feel it should be *on.
Thanx/NSP
FarmI schrieb:
Which is the better construction? * I do not know ... do not know anyone there who I can speak to.

The latter, however it is not usual to finish a sentence with a preposition. If I wrote this sentence, I ... to whom I can speak". However, that way of writing is probably considered to be rather old fashioned these days

Exactly - there is absolutely nothing wrong with ending a sentence with a preposition in modern English. Only in very very formal English is it generally avoided.
Indeed you could write the sencond sentence (the only correct one): ""I don't know anyone there I can talk to" as you can omit the relative pronoun in identifying relative clauses when it's the object of the sentence or a preposition placed at the end of the clause.

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
* He was going off to night school when he saw a firework lying *in* the road. In a book titled "Practical Everyday English Steven Colins ISBN 91-646-1481-6", I found the above sentence. Why should it be in*? I feel it should be *on.

"On" implies on the surface of the road, whereas "in" implies in the middle of the road. "In" seems more natural to me, but I wouldn't be disturbed by "on".
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/needful suggests needful* is adjective. Why do then the use of *needful in the following sentence correct?
* Please do the needful.
Thanx/NSP
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
suggests needful* is adjective. Why do then the use of *needful in the following sentence correct? * Please do the needful.

It is possible to create a collective noun by putting the word "the" before an adjective: "the rich" means "all rich people", "the sick" means "all sick people". In this case "the needful" is "everything that is needed/necessary".
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
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* Headed a team of about fifteen personnel comprising of about six junior engineers and other supporting staff.
How can the above sentence be bettered?
Thanx/NSP
n o s p a m p l e a s e schrieb:
* Headed a team of about fifteen personnel comprising of about six junior engineers and other supporting staff. How can the above sentence be bettered?

This isn't a sentence at all - it doesn't have a subject.

The use of "about" twice is also a bit much. Why the imprecision? - you name two specific numbers. Why can't you simply state them?

Also: What do you mean by "junior engineers"? Young ones? Ones in training? Inexperienced ones?
"He headed a team of fifteen consisting of 6 junior engineers and other support staff."
If the team varied in size, you could try:
"The team he headed usually consisted of 15 people, among them about 6 junior engineers and other support staff."
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
* Headed a team of about fifteen personnel comprising of about six junior engineers and other supporting staff. How can the above sentence be bettered? Thanx/NSP

Comprising only. Remove the 'of'.
If this is part of a list in a resume the grammar is otherwise fine but you might want to add what
the team accomplished while you headed it.
Should also be more definite in number. You don't want to give the impression you did not know how many
people worked for you.
If it varied just say, 'varying from 12-15 or whatever numbers are appropriate.
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* I tried phoning her office, but I couldn't get through.

This shows there was some problem with phone system. Can we use get through even when she didn't pick up the phone or she wasn't there to attend the phone.
Thanx/NSP
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