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Hi

1) a red hat that doesn't suit me

- Is "that doesn't suit me" a postmodifier of "hat"? "hat" is the head noun am I right?

2) three pounds of sausages at a go

- Is "of sausages at a go" or "of sausages" the postmodifier of "pounds"?

3) We shall have friends to dinner & read the papers

- "dinner" is a verb or noun?

4) so that people who know me are not too shocked and surprised

- Is this whole sentence consider a noun phrase?

5) The connectivity offered by the digital age

- Is "offered by the digital age" a postmodifier of "connectivity"?

6) our public housing policy that encourages a diverse mix of races

- Is "housing" a noun or adjective?
- Is "that encourages a diverse mix of races" the postmodifier of "policy"?

7) this single belief in making our diversity our strength

- Is "in making our diversity our strength" the postmodifier of "belief"?

Sorry for asking so many questions. I really appreciate the help. Thank you!
Comments  
Ohayo.

1) a red hat that doesn't suit me -- The clause postmodifies hat, which is the head noun.

2) three pounds of sausages at a go -- Of sausages postmodifies pounds; at a go is a sentence adverb.

3) We shall have friends to dinner & read the papers -- Dinner is a noun.

4) so that people who know me are not too shocked and surprised -- This is not a complete sentence, it is a dependent clause; it cannot be a phrase, because it has a subject and verb (plus an embedded clause); I cannot tell its function without the rest of the sentence, but I surmise is it an adverbial.

5) The connectivity offered by the digital age -- Offered...age is a nonfinite clause postmodifying connectivity.

6) our public housing policy that encourages a diverse mix of races -- Housing is a noun acting as an adjective; that...races modifies policy.

7) this single belief in making our diversity our strength -- In...strength modifies belief.
Mister Micawber3) We shall have friends to dinner & read the papers -- Dinner is a noun.

Since "dinner" is a noun, does "to dinner" modifies "friends"?

The full sentence is this - So that people who know me are not too shocked and surprised when suddenly I am old and start to wear purple.

Thus is "who know me are not too shocked and surprised" or just "who know me" modifies people?
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Hi
Ohayo
Mister Micawber3) We shall have friends to dinner & read the papers -- Dinner is a noun.

Since "dinner" is a noun, does "to dinner" modifies "friends"?

The full sentence is this - So that people who know me are not too shocked and surprised when suddenly I am old and start to wear purple.

Thus is "who know me are not too shocked and surprised" or just "who know me" modifies people?

We shall have friends to dinner(,) and (we shall) read the paper.

"Since 'dinner' is a noun??, does 'to dinner' modifies 'friends'?" No.

'to dinner' is a prep phrase, and modifies the verb phrase: 'shall have'.
InchoateknowledgeWe shall have friends to dinner(,) and (we shall) read the paper.

"Since 'dinner' is a noun??, does 'to dinner' modifies 'friends'?" No.

'to dinner' is a prep phrase, and modifies the verb phrase: 'shall have'.

But a prep phrase can be a postmodifier to the head noun right?
Ohayo
Inchoateknowledge
We shall have friends to dinner(,) and (we shall) read the paper.

"Since 'dinner' is a noun??, does 'to dinner' modifies 'friends'?" No.

'to dinner' is a prep phrase, and modifies the verb phrase: 'shall have'.

But a prep phrase can be a postmodifier to the head noun right?

Yes, but this is not the case here.

flights to Los Angeles is a noun phrase and the prep phrase to LA postmodifies the head: flights.
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We shall have friends (to dinner = at dinner time)

to dinner is a prep phrase in adverb function, and it modifies the whole sentence (not the verb -- sorry).
Yes, as IK said, to dinner is a prepositional phrase acting as a sentence adverbial.

So that people who know me are not too shocked and surprised when suddenly I am old and start to wear purple-- this is still not a complete sentence. So that is a subordinating conjunction; the whole thing is a dependent clause.

However, a clause within the clause, 'who know me', modifies people.