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Hello!
I am doing a proofreading at the moment and need help with a few issues, as I have been working since 8 o'clock today and my mind is not sure of anything anymore.

@page { size: 21cm 29.7cm; margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm }
"Since 1900, United States changed between what historians call "public actions and private interests."" - I feel the comma is not needed here. What do you think?

@page { size: 21cm 29.7cm; margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm }
"In another time, they become disillusioned with the social experiments and focus on themselves." - never heard of such a phrase. I would remove 'at' leaving 'another time' only. What's your idea?

@page { size: 21cm 29.7cm; margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm }
"At the beginning of the Great Depression, the pendulum swung again, and Roosevelt's New Deal and Truman's Fair Deal focuses on government actions to alleviate the social misery." - Any ideas about this one? I would remove all the commas and changes the word 'focuses' into 'focus'.

@page { size: 21cm 29.7cm; margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm }
"Conservatism returned during 1950 under Eisenhower, to be followed by a shift in the direction of liberalism in the “new frontier” of Kennedy and Johnson's “Great Society”." - Wouldn't you add 's' to 1950 and have 1950s - this is what I feel with the word during. The New Frontier or New Frontier? I would also remove the quoting marks and write it in capital letters. The same with Great Society - no capitals.



"It reached a climax in the selection of Ronald Regan in 1990." - What about this? It 'reached a climax' or it 'reached climax' is enough here? 'Selection' should be 'election' obviously, but what about the phrase 'in the election'? Shouldn't it be 'after the election'?

Thabk you so much for all your answers and help.

All the best,

Finka
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Hi,

I am doing a proofreading at the moment and need help with a few issues, as I have been working since 8 o'clock today and my mind is not sure of anything anymore.

@page { size: 21cm 29.7cm; margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm }

"Since 1900, the United States has changed between what historians call "public actions and private interests."" - I feel the comma is not needed here. What do you think? I agree.

'Changed' does not aseem a suitable verb.

Actions and interests seem disimilar, yet your meaning seems to suggest they are alike in some way.

@page { size: 21cm 29.7cm; margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm }

"In another time, they become disillusioned with the social experiments and focus on themselves." - never heard of such a phrase. I would remove 'at' leaving 'another time' only. What's your idea?

Both sound awkward to me. How about 'On another occasion'?

@page { size: 21cm 29.7cm; margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm }

"At the beginning of the Great Depression, the pendulum swung again, and Roosevelt's New Deal and Truman's Fair Deal focused on government actions to alleviate the social misery." - Any ideas about this one? I would remove all the commas and changes the word 'focuses' into 'focus'. I prefer the commas. They help me to see the different prts that make up the sentence.

@page { size: 21cm 29.7cm; margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm }

"Conservatism returned during 1950 under Eisenhower, to be followed by a shift in the direction of liberalism in the “new frontier” of Kennedy and Johnson's “Great Society”." - Wouldn't you add 's' to 1950 and have 1950s - this is what I feel with the word during.

I'd say 'in 1950', 'during the 1950s'.T

he New Frontier or New Frontier? the

I would also remove the quoting marks and write it in capital letters. The same with Great Society - no capitals. I prefer the quotes, to stress that these men created these phrases. I believe that capitals are normally used for them.

"It reached a climax in the selection of Ronald Reagan in 1990." - What about this? It 'reached a climax' or it 'reached climax' is enough here? 'Selection' should be 'election' obviously, Probably, although the public selected him via the election. Emotion: smile

but what about the phrase 'in the election'? Shouldn't it be 'after the election'? 'In' is probably what you want.

Clive

Thabk you so much for all your answers and help.
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Paulina
Hi Paulina,

What are you referring to, please?

Clive
Hello Clive,

My company is looking for a new translator and the sample is part of the qualification process... Didn't someone say that Google is today's Big Brother? Emotion: smile

Paulina
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