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Need-not

"Need-not" is a noun and my question is: Is need a verb or a noun in that compound noun?

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tkacka15"Need-not" is a noun

I have never seen, heard or used that expression. The only hyphenated similar construction is "need-to-know."

I checked the American Corpus, 520 million citations, and got nothing. There were no hits in the British Corpus either. Then the Web corpus had 13 hits, but they were all of this sort, or punctuation errors.

 Another team divided them into " must-know, should-know, nice-to-know, need-not know. " Everybody seemed to have fun. How would you divide them?

Punctuation error:

They came together in fellowship to quilt, or help neighbors in need-not sending an email or text!!

Moral: Forget this "word"

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tkacka15"Need-not" is a noun and my question is: Is need a verb or a noun in that compound noun?

verb (Just as 'know' is a verb in the noun 'know-it-all'.)

(Never heard it, however.)

CJ

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For what reason do you need to know?I've never seen this construction, so I'm curious why you are asking.

☆ Forget-me-not = a flower (noun)

Generally, if it comes from a verb, we use a gerund/participle for compound nouns:

reading room, sitting room, dining table, shopping bag, thinking cap, run(ning) time.

BUT: runtime, stoplight, turnover (nouns)

?

nel0506I've never seen this construction, so I'm curious why you are asking.

See this:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/need-not

I'm a bit curious about that. If "need" is a noun, then it would be modified by the adverb "not" in that compound phrase, wouldn't it?

I thought the same - it's a noun and there's no reason to deconstruct it. It's not one that I've ever heard in the UK, but a quick search showed Merriam-Webster listing it, so I guess it's used in the US.

If someone's asking you to deconstruct it, I'd want to know what possible benefit it could bring!

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David HattonIf someone's asking you to deconstruct it, I'd want to know what possible benefit it could bring!

I understand that, in English, nouns modified by adverbs are a sort of rarity, for example, "quite a noise", so to find another is interesting. I don't treat my interest in the English grammar as something that gives me some advantage or a benefit; it's rather a thing of curiosity and fun.

David HattonI guess it's used in the US.

I have never seen it or heard it, and I'm pretty old. The OED calls it "now rare", with the last real citation being from 1859, and does not label it US or UK, showing citations for both.

Whatnot - is a pronoun.

I have heard that used before (US).

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/whatnot

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 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
nel0506Whatnot - is a pronoun.I have heard that used before (US).

Right. I was talking about "need-not". And to address the OP's question, a hyphenated thing like "need-not" is a single word. Sometimes we use a hyphen, sometimes we run them together, often the Brits use a hyphen where the Americans use one word. "Need" in "need-not" is a syllable, not a part of speech, but it can be construed as a verb in analyzing the construction. The idea is that you need it not, not that it has no need.

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