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His style seems to be inspired directly from the natural world which he paints. He is able to capture the serene beauty of the forest, as well as the liveliness and motion of the creatures which dwell in it. He paints almost casually, but the simplicity of his strokes unveil a world as detailed and mysterious as our own.
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'His style seems to be inspired directly by the natural world which he paints. He is able to capture the serene beauty of the forest, as well as the liveliness ['MOTION' IS REDUNDANT] of the creatures which dwell in it. He paints almost casually, but the simplicity of his strokes unveils a world as detailed and mysterious as our own.' [THE UNDERLINED IS NOT MEANINGFUL. MY WORLD IS NOT MYSTERIOUS LIKE A FOREST]
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Your sharp eye has caught 3 mistakes.
As for "our own is a mysterious thing", take a look at HOW BRAINS THINK by William H. Calvin, of UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON:

Human consciousness is just about the last surviving mystery. A mystery is a phenomenon that people don't know how to think about -- yet. There have been other great mysteries: the mystery of the origin of the universe, the mystery of life and reproduction, the mystery of the design to be found in nature, the mysteries of time, space, and gravity. These were not just areas of scientific ignorance, but of utter bafflement and wonder. We do not yet have all the answers to any of the questions of cosmology and particle physics, molecular genetics and evolutionary theory, but we do know how to think about them.... With consciousness, however, we are still in a terrible muddle. Consciousness stands alone today as a topic that often leaves even the most sophisticated thinkers tongue-tied and confused. And, as with all of the earlier mysteries, there are many who insist -- and hope -- that there will never be a demystification of consciousness.
Daniel C. Dennett, Consciousness Explained, 1991
http://williamcalvin.com/bk8/bk8ch3.htm
That's a very interesting reference, Jobb, but you should not expect your reader to identify a philosophy of the human consciousness with your reference to 'our own' in your sentence about the artist. As it stands, it leaves the reader a little non-plussed as to what the writer means.