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I have some sentences here:

1)

I do not know anything

I do not know a thing

I do not know nothing

I think I have heard the three somewhere, is the third sentence can only be used in Informal English to mean" I don't know anything:?

2)

Many years ago, people often said" A woman's place is in the home". But Americans do not feel that way_____more

a) any

b) no

Why we choose a but not b?
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Hi Belly

Not + no shouldn't be used at the same time. However, not + a negative prefix (un, in, il, ir etc.) is OK:

Such remarks are not uncommon where he lives.

CB
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I don't know anything

Anything sounds negative, doesn't it? So if it sounds negative, why would people still use that structure?
BellyI don't know anything

Anything sounds negative, doesn't it? So if it sounds negative, why would people still use that structure?

You ask them, perhaps they'll tell you.Emotion: smile Seriously, there has to be a way to sayI don't know anything and there is another alternative: I know nothing if you don't like anything. Anything is possible without not and the meaning is completely different:

You may say anything. (= You may say whatever you want to.)

So, anything without not shouldn't sound very negative at all.

CB
Cool BreezeYou may say anything.
Most grammarians argue a double negative makes a sentence positive but it is not true.For example: "You may say anything." does not mean the same as "You may not say nothing."
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