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respected sir,

I have to join these sentences using neither .....nor. I have tried it myself ,but I have some doubt . The doubt is that repeated preposition sholud be before neither or ofter neither and also after nor.

1. She is not fond of tea.
She is not fond of milk.

she is neither fond of tea nor fond of milk.

or

She is fond of neither tea nor milk.

2.John was not on the swing.
He was not on the slide.

John wan neither on the swing nor on the slide.

or

John was on neither the swing nor the slide.

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Here i have to use either ....... or

3. He may find it in the desk.
He may find it in the cupboard.

4. He may find it on the desk.
He may find it in the cupboard.

Please help me explain .
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Correct the sentence given below.

The big building turned out as school.

Please help me.
Thanks.
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Hello, Hanuman-- Welcome to English forums.

These two are grammatically possible, but are not the best style:

(1a) 'She is neither fond of tea nor fond of milk.'
(2a) 'John was neither on the swing nor on the slide. '

These are the preferred forms (place your neither/nors as near as possible to the alternatives and omit the redundant preposition if there is one):

'She is fond of neither tea nor milk.'
'John was on neither the swing nor the slide.'

Placement rules for either/or are identical to neither/nor-- as near as possible to the alternatives and omit unnecessary prepositions:

(3) 'He may find it in either the desk or the cupboard.'

(4) 'He may find it either on the desk or in the cupboard.'

The last, I presume, is meant to be:

'The big building turned out to be a school.'
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Anonymoushe may find it on the desk or in the cupboard either..( for second sentence i'm not sure..)
No, the word 'either' is not correctly used in that sentence, Anon.
However, you can use 'either' at the end of a negative sentence (not ...either) such as this:
He will not find it on the desk, and he will not find it in the cupboard either.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  
he may find it either on the desk or in the cupboard

or

he may find it on the desk or in the cupboard either..( for second sentence i'm not sure.....)
 Yankee's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Neither Mr. Sam nor Mr. Jones was there.