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Could I use present perfect too? What is the difference between these two?

1. I never forgot to punch in my hours after I found out that I was missing some hours.

2. I have never forgot to punch in my hours after I found out that I was missing some hours.

Thanks.
Comments  
Hello, Jack!

To me, n°1 belongs to the past; you're talking about a time when you used to work in a firm, and at that time you never forgot to punch in your hours.

N°2 should be "I have never forgotten"; you're still working in the firm. In that sentence, you could replace "after" by "since".
Dear Jack112,

It is indeed so. You may not use «after» in your second sentence. You must say «since».

Kind regards, Emotion: smile

Goldmund
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I still don't see why 'after' is wrong? Could someone explain the difference in meaning of these sentences so I could compare? Thanks.

1. I have never forgot to punch in my hours after I found out that I was missing some hours.

2. I have never forgot to punch in my hours since I found out that I was missing some hours.
Pieanne,
I think the past participles "got" and "forgot" are British.
I think only the Americans use the past participles "gotten" and "forgotten".
Jim
I don't sense that "after" is actually wrong, but "since" is certainly more idiomatic with the present perfect.
On the other hand, "after" almost implies a definite time in the past, which is incompatible with the present perfect.
All in all, "since" is a much better choice.
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We do "forgotten" over here too. "I have forgot" has a slightly poetic air:


I have forgot much, Cynara! gone with the wind,
Flung roses, roses, riotously with the throng,
Dancing, to put thy pale lost lilies out of mind...
etc.

MrP
"I have forgot" has a slightly poetic air
Cautious addendum: or "regional".

(There's bound to be a BrE dialect somewhere that uses it.)

MrP