+0
She was nevertheless of religious habits

What does nevertheless of religious habits mean?
+0
Hi guys,

She was nevertheless of religious habits

I'd like to comment a little more about 'of religious habits'.

This phrase is a rather literary and formal way of describing her. It describes one of her attributes.

eg She was of a happy disposition.

eg She was of medium height.

eg She was of a dark complexion.

The phrase is not connected to the word 'nevetheless', which could easily be removed or placed in another position in the sentence.

Consider these examples.

Nevertheless, she was of religious habits.

She was of religious habits.

Nevertheless, she was happy.

She was happy.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
It means "nevertheless, (despite what has already been said about her or what you would expect of her) she had religious habits."

The meaning of "religious habits" depends somewhat on context -- it could mean that she was actually religious and habitually prayed, attended religious services, etc. But sometimes we say that someone does something "religiously" to mean that they take it very seriously and never neglect it or ignore it. ("He watered his lawn religiously -- every morning at exactly 6 a.m.") Could you give us more context for the quote in question?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
"It is possible that Sophie-Victoire's conduct was irreproachable during her husband's lifetime, but after his death, she returned to her former ways. She was nevertheless of religious habits and would not, upon any account, have missed attending mass."
Rene Doumic.

The general meaning:

It is possible that Sophie-Victoire's behaviour was good .. but she returned to her old ways.
( She went back to her bad habits. )
She was, in spite of this, a person of religious habits.
( Here, 'of' is used to mean 'with', or 'having'. )

She was nevertheless of religious habits ...
In spite of this, she had religious habits.
Despite this, she had religious habits.

The author means that although Sophie-Victoire's conduct was generally bad,
she continued to have religious habits.

Having a habit of going to church is not the same as being, in the fullest sense of the word, religious.
Although she didn't attend religious services regularly, she was, nevertheless, of religious habits.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies