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A jug handle is also to turn left but from a minor highway (like NJ Rt 1) to a lesser ... by instead drawing cars off to the right a bit and then facing to the left (also allowing safer U-turns).

So that they're 90° to the flow of traffic they've left (and want to cross) is that it?
Sensible idea if it is.
Hm...I have a semantic distinction here... the thing that cars ... to walk through. What is that called (pick your dialect)?

A passage or passageway? In the UK, we would probably call it an alley or alleyway. Over here, alleys are usually too narrow for cars.

In South Wales, it's a gwyli (but I've only heard it rhyming with "bully").

Mike.

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I had the same thought (mutatis mutandis) about "cloverleaf" on ... though: is that something like one quarter of a cloverleaf?

Those are pretty different, too. A cloverleaf is a connector where you go 270 degrees to the right in order ... just doesn't sound right in this situation)). Jug handles usually come in pairs (the minor intersecting road won't have them).

Right. To have my turn, they use jug handles where there is no room for a center left turn lane. And where they don't want to take the time awway from the highway to have a green for the cross traffic and a different green for a left turn lane. And where there is that minor highway (And Route 1 is a prime example, though I saw them in one other plade in New Jersey also.) and they want that to have green lights 90% of the time.
But there are usually minor cross-streets and sometimes they can squeeze the jug handle in the parking lot that already exists on busy highways, but other times I'm sure they condemn and remove the building on the right just before the cross-street Then the right hand lane of the highway swerves off to the right and joins up with the cross street, several car lengths away from the highway. So that cars can wait there until their light turns green.

It's pretty simple, but I didn't think of it. In fact I didn't even get it the first time or two I saw the sign for one. I'm still driving, trying to figure out how to turn left.
They aren't labeled with a word, only a drawing, so you have to learn what they're called.
In Baltimore the traffic reports refer to the "triple bridges" and I lived her for 3 or 4 years before I figured out what they were, and that I drove underneath them 5 or 10 times a week! (An interstate and
2 layers of elevated ramp, one above the other) I also thought the JFXwas the John F. Kennedy eXpressway, which is a name on the map, but they all call it I-95. It turned out, after several years, that the JFX was the Jones Falls eXpressway.
Mitch

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A passage or passageway? In the UK, we would probably call it an alley or alleyway. Over here, alleys are usually too narrow for cars.

That's because they were built before cars were invented...

Yes, but my point was that if they were wide enough for cars, I doubt that Brits would call them alleys.
Cheers
Tony

Tony Mountifield
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In fact the questionnaire did not enquire as to where one learn one's language, just the current whereabouts, which was rather silly of it IMO.

Copied from the page where one registers:
"In order to map our results accurately, we need to know where you acquired your dialect features. This usually (but not always) means that you should enter the information below based on where you were raised."
Regardless of that wildly irritating, yet increasingly prevalent, misuse of 'based on', and accepting 'raised' as possibly being an AmE synonym for 'brought up', this seems to indicate that you may have misunderstood something. I had no idea what the postcode is for the place where I was 'raised', because postcodes hadn't been invented before I left. I had to look it up on Multimap.
Noel
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That's because they were built before cars were invented...

Yes, but my point was that if they were wide enough for cars, I doubt that Brits would call them alleys.

It rather looks as if the word always designated a footway connecting two streets. "Passage" fulfilled the same function, but could probably take traffic. "Yard" or "Court" were closed, but could take vehicles.
John Briggs
The cloverleaf usually comes in fours (one for each possible change in direction to the left (a 'left turn' just doesn't sound right in this situation)). Jug handles usually come in pairs (the minor intersecting road won't have them).

I think of "a cloverleaf" as the full set: four spiral ramps for left turns, enclosed by four diagonal ramps for right turns.

Odysseus

The cloverleaf usually comes in fours (one for each possible ... come in pairs (the minor intersecting road won't have them).

I think of "a cloverleaf" as the full set: four spiral ramps for left turns, enclosed by four diagonal ramps for right turns.

That was later. Somehow the early drawings of cloverleafs didn't have the ramps for right turns. I guess everyone had to turn left three times. Emotion: smile
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Having said that, I say 'scone' to rhyme with 'stone'. I've never heard it pronounced scoon.

I seem to remember that "scoon" is the proper pronunciation of the Scottish place-name "Scone". The bun is "scon" for me now, but the "stone" version was what I heard as a child.

Same here - does this mean the "stone" version is dying out, I don't remember hearing it at all since I was young, and I'd feel too self-conscious to use it now.
BTW, I would NOT classify a "scone" as a "bun". But we've been through this before - others seem to use "bun" for a much wider category of things than I do. I'd say a bun has to be both sweet and made of dough.

Matthew Huntbach
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