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Hey Charles, how many syllables in your first name? The informal version seems to suggest that there are two, since the final "ls" isn't capitalized, but the ASCII IPA shows only one. Or was your informal version meant to suggest that your name is 1.5 syllables?

If it were relevant, I'd point out that I pronounce your name in two syllables, ('tSA:r-lz).

('dZE:ri fri:[email protected])
Hey Charles, how many syllables in your first name? The informal version seems to suggest that there are two, since ... the ASCII IPA shows only one. Or was your informal version meant to suggest that your name is 1.5 syllables?

Actually it was me that wrote those. Charles simply shrugged at the informal version and said "I guess so". For the ASCII IPA he shrugged and said "I dunno". So any problems are of my making rather than Charles's.
I don't go in for syllable-counting myself, especially when we get down to decimal precision, so I find it hard to answer your questions as posed. And I'm barely literate ASCII-IPA-wise.
If it were relevant, I'd point out that I pronounce your name in two syllables, ('tSA:r-lz).

You did, so it must be. :-)
('tSA:r-lz) looks good to me, from what I remember of Charles' voice. Informally, CHAR-lz looks better than what I've got now.

Any objections?

Mike Barnes
Webmaster, http://alt-usage-english.org /
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... Hey Charles, how many syllables in your first name? The informal version seems to suggest that there are two, ... name is 1.5 syllables? If it were relevant, I'd point out that I pronounce your name in two syllables, ('tSA:r-lz).

Not ('tSA:r l-z)?
By the way, the calling test can be used to determine the number of syllables. If you have two, you call "Oh, (tSA: [email protected])" (or something similar). If you have one, you call "Oh, (tSA: Arlz)". If the pitch falls within the vowel, you have one.

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1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >stops, and a train station is wherePalo Alto, CA 94304 >a train stops, what does that say

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... Hey Charles, how many syllables in your first name? ... out that I pronounce your name in two syllables, ('tSA:r-lz).

Not ('tSA:r l-z)? By the way, the calling test can be used to determine the number of syllables. If you ... similar). If you have one, you call "Oh, (tSA: Arlz)". If the pitch falls within the vowel, you have one.

My coworkers have asked me to stop muttering "Charles" over and over. I'd best not start calling it out loud. It's hard to pronounce in one syllable for a rhotic speaker, I think, without winding up sounding like Tom Brokaw.

rzed
How do you know that? The picture was only of his face.

No, it's from the waist, up. And a woman would have straightened the tie before allowing someone to take the picture. You guys are lost without us.

Is this a crack about asking directions?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
You guys are lost without us.

Is this a crack about asking directions?

Works for me.

Dena Jo
(Email: Replace TPUBGTH with denajo2)
But the 'People call me "Bob"' segment of Mr. Cunningham's recording at the above URL has a near-perfect "aw" and "ah" that could easily become the alt.usage.english standard for "aw" and "ah". Listen for the excellent "PEEP-l CAWL mee BAHB" in that recording.

My ears can't detect any difference between the vowels of Bob's "call" and "Bob". I don't (yet) have formant-analysis software on my computer, so without knowing whether the vowels actually are objectively different, I can think of two explanations:
(a) The vowels in Bob's "Bob" and "call" actually are the same, and you're just hearing what you expect to hear.
(b) The vowels in Bob's "Bob" and "call" are different (although not phonemically so), and I can't hear the difference because I don't distinguish those two vowels either. I don't think it would be remarkable for Bob to have different sounds in those two words; in American English a following /l/ often has a strong backing effect on vowels that precede it. In many American dialects, /u/ and /o/ are so far fronted as to be more central vowels than back vowels(1), but before /l/ they remain fully back (u) and (oU).
(1) Or more specifically, they're diphthongs with a central nucleus and back offglide.
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
On 10 Oct 2003 21:34:23 GMT, Dena Jo
Is this a crack about asking directions?

Works for me.

Everybody works for you, Deej.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/docrobin/homepage.htm
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My coworkers have asked me to stop muttering "Charles" over and over. I'd best not start calling it out loud. It's hard to pronounce in one syllable for a rhotic speaker, I think, without winding up sounding like Tom Brokaw.

There's nothing either monosyllabic or disyllabic but thinking makes it so. That is to say, when you've got a bunch of vocoids (=vowels or semivowels) and liquids together, whether or not they form separate syllables or one heavy syllable has more to do, I think, with the way such a pronunciation patterns in your dialect than the actual acoustic form of the word. This is especially true in English, which is a stress-timed language - i.e., having more or fewer syllables doesn't actually make a word take more or less time to say. I have "Charles" as one syllable, but I wouldn't be surprised if my pronunciation of "Charles" is only trivially different from yours. It's how we'd fit it into poetry, or how it appears in Evan's calling-out-loud test, that counts the number of syllables.

-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
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