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If you were cooking supper for Charles and Charles was ... you call out "CHAAA-AAARLZ" or would you call out "CHARR-ULLZ"?

I would quietly say "Dominoes," and they and all their little friends would come running. Actually, I would call out ... you're on here. When I see ASCII IPA, my eyes tend to glass over and my brain immediately fogs up.

I'm not taking sides here, but for me "Charles" is a one syllable word, and I believe it's so no matter how you define syllable.

I knew someone with the surname "Quarles", and I think I said that as two syllables, like "quarrels". (No one here thinks "quarrel" is a one-syllable word, I hope.)
This all sounds sort of familiar.
There's a new page on the alt-usage-english site, showing the pronunciation of some regular contributors' names. http://alt-usage-english.org/audio gallery/ The page ... Richoux Charles Riggs Harvey Van Sickle Garry J. Vass Michael West Raymond S. Wise To everybody involved - thank you.

LOL! That's insane! The pronunciations don't even sound right. And why does Rey have like 6 names listed? What's written is CLEARLY NOT what's pronounced for him. I have a feeling this is going to end up confusing more foreigners. And who the hell pronounces "Barnes" (B-A-**R**-N-E-S) as "BAHHZZ". That's completely inaccurate and misleading! There's no such thing as a silent R. People with strange accents just think they can get away with "ignoing" it. I would have thought better of this group's pronunciation skills. One name I've always been confused as to how to pronounce is "Lieblich". Is the "ch" pronounced like a "ch" usually is in English, or is it a hard C/K sound? I've always imagined the latter; Leah the former.
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Not ('tSA:r l-z)? By the way, the calling test can ... If the pitch falls within the vowel, you have one.

My coworkers have asked me to stop muttering "Charles" over and over. I'd best not start calling it out loud. It's hard to pronounce in one syllable for a rhotic speaker, I think, without winding up sounding like Tom Brokaw.

Tom Brokaw?! LOL! How pointless! What about his pronunciation? He's weird, isn't he?
As RF would say, I don't know from ASCII ... not be represented by "uh." Does that help at all?

If you were cooking supper for Charles and Charles was playing outside with his friend Tony Cooper from around the ... Charles to let him know that supper was ready, would you call out "CHAAA-AAARLZ" or would you call out "CHARR-ULLZ"?

If I were to call out in the circumstances you gave, I would yell "CHARRR-RUH-uhllz." That's an R short and a syllable longer than your second version, but more like what my call-out would sound like. As indicated, the third syllable would be the one on which my voiced dropped.
I had to call out several times to figure out exactly how I do it. Three kids in the neighborhood came over to tell me that Chuckie moved a year ago. (Just kidding. Actually, what happened is that Charles called on the phone to tell me I woke him up.) (Okay, just kidding there, too.)

As Dena Jo said, calling out can frequently turn a one-syllable word into two syllables. Someone else said something similar earlier, I think. It's very possible that calling out, for some of us, anyway, adds an extra syllable to longer words/names.
My own name, called out, would be Muh-REE-UHH-uhh. I can hear it now, in my head, just as it was when my friends would stand on the porch or out on the sidewalk, calling for me to come out and play. Knocking on the door was not something kids did back then. Regional? I don't know. I'm talking about the late-1940s-early-1950s in Detroit (or Daytwa, if you like).
Maria Conlon
I question that "ordinary looking" can be construed as derogatory ... and seems quite kempt. I rather like his tie, too.

It is my favourite tie and one I bought particularly for the suit. Dena may not like it, but what ... picking a colour or pattern that appeals to the artistic eye of man for any of a number of reasons.

Is that last sentence correct? I don't think we're allowed to do that with question marks in English. Spanish is another story. I'm pretty sure you either have to put the question mark at the END of the sentence, even though that's vague. Or you have to make the "Especially..." part its own sentence fragment.
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A man without a woman is like a fish without a bicycle!
} (1) Or more specifically, they're diphthongs with a central nucleus and } back offglide. I get tingles just reading this kind of stuff.

It's that mention of "diphthongs." It reminds you of "thongs," doesn't it? Maria Conlon

"I thought the man backstage had a speech impediment and that he was trying to say it is 'SONG' Week, but it came out as 'thong' instead." Minnie Driver
"Let me see that thong." Sisqo
If you were cooking supper for Charles and Charles was ... you call out "CHAAA-AAARLZ" or would you call out "CHARR-ULLZ"?

Actually, I would call out "CHAAA-AAARLZ." But calling out is inconclusive as the effect it has is frequently to turn a one-syllable word into two.

Actually, that's exactly the point. You have have at least one syllable past the one that carries stress when calling, so if the word ends on the stressed syllable (and a special case of this is when there's only one syllable), you automatically repeat the vowel. (Or, in the case of a diphthong, you use the first element before the break and the entire diphthong after.) So the fact that you call "CHAAA-AAARLZ" rather than "CHAAARR-ULLZ" shows that you consider the word to have one syllable.
To my ears, "Charles" is a one syllable word, albeit a somewhat protracted syllable.

Exactly. I have it as two syllables and go the other way when calling.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >A handgun is like a Lawyer. You
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >don't want it lying around wherePalo Alto, CA 94304 >the children might be exposed to
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My own name, called out, would be Muh-REE-UHH-uhh. I can hear it now, in my head, just as it was ... to come out and play. Knocking on the door was not something kids did back then. Regional? I don't know.

I dunno. I think back in my day doorbells were mainly used, but there would have been some situations where it would be more effective to actually call out the name of the person presumed to be inside. What I don't remember much of is actual knocking on doors, unless maybe for some reason someone didn't have a doorbell.
I'm talking about the late-1940s-early-1950s in Detroit (or Daytwa, if you like).

Were people still using the French pronunciation that late? How 'bout for Grosse Pointe does anyone ever say "Ggghoss Pwahnt" (besides me)?

What ever happened with that "Eastpointe" campaign, BTW?
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