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I'm not taking sides here, but for me "Charles" is a one syllable word, and I believe it's so no matter how you define syllable.

Thinking more about it, I see you're right. I don't see a reasonable way of separating it into two, no matter how it's pronounced.

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs¦at¦eircom¦dot¦net
My own name, called out, would be Muh-REE-UHH-uhh.

I've just met a girl named Muh-REE-UHH-uhh...

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
My roommate in college once wrote a song (for a musical comedy) that included the ostensibly dactylic lyrics (with caps ... of all GIRls I've SEEN, : you're three STANdard errors OVer the MEAN. And to me it never scanned satisfactorily.

Easily fixed:
My DARling ChriSTENE,
Of GIRls that I've SEEN,
You're THREE sigmas OVer the MEAN.
To me(,) "girls" is one syllable

Yes, albeit an exceptionally heavy one.
and "errors" is two.

Yes, but its problem in the original version is that it's too heavy for its metrical slot, even if we hear it as one syllable.
But I bet my pronunciations of at least "girls" and maybe "errors" as well would not be noticeably different from him.

Oy!
Btw, the original lines 2 & 3 are anapaestic, not dactylic. To call all three lines dactylic, you have to bend the ideal drastically at both ends (a singly or doubly upbeat start, plus a doubly reduced finish); but to call them amphibrachs, you need bend the ideal only at the finish. In the fixed version, the meter of the whole is unarguably amphibrachic catalectic.
My roommate in college once wrote a song (for a musical comedy) that included the ostensibly dactylic lyrics (with caps ... of all GIRls I've SEEN, : you're three STANdard errors OVer the MEAN. And to me it never scanned satisfactorily.

Easily fixed:
My DARling ChriSTENE,
Of GIRLS that I've SEEN,
You're THREE sigmas OVer the MEAN.
To me(,) "girls" is one syllable

Yes, albeit an exceptionally long one.
and "errors" is two.

Yes, but its problem in the original version is that it's too long for its metrical slot, even if we hear it as one syllable.
But I bet my pronunciations of at least "girls" and maybe "errors" as well would not be noticeably different from him.

Oy!
Btw, the original lines 2 & 3 are anapaestic, not dactylic. To call all three lines dactylic, you have to bend the ideal drastically at both ends: with an extrametrical singly or doubly upbeat start, plus a doubly reduced finish. So why not bend the ideal only at the finish, and only a little, and call the feet amphibrachs? In the fixed version, the meter of the whole is unarguably amphibrachic catalectic.
Could it be that you've really been One of Us, a CINC, all along, and just didn't know it? We welcome you, Long-Lost Brother.

I may* sometimes have a *little rounding of my vowel in "call", but not enough to say the vowel is not (A).

No matter what they say, Bob, I heard and understood every vowel much more clearly than some I've heard from around Texas and Louisiana. It was a CINCh.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/docrobin/homepage.htm
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I'm not taking sides here, but for me "Charles" is a one syllable word, and I believe it's so no matter how you define syllable.

Thinking more about it, I see you're right. I don't see a reasonable way of separating it into two, no matter how it's pronounced.

Well, both "CHA-rles" and "CHAR-les" are possibilities. In either case there'd be no vowel in the second syllable; its nucleus is a syllabic (L). There's nothing wrong with this per se; the same is true of the nucleus of the second syllables of, say, "riddles", and no one makes a fuss about it.
I say "Charles" with one syllable, anyway.
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
... Hey Charles, how many syllables in your first name? ... out that I pronounce your name in two syllables, ('tSA:r-lz).

Not ('tSA:r l-z)?

Right. That's what I meant, only I was trying to leave the syllable break ambiguous (but I misplaced the hyphen through mere forgetfulness).
By the way, the calling test can be used to determine the number of syllables. If you have two, you ... similar). If you have one, you call "Oh, (tSA: Arlz)". If the pitch falls within the vowel, you have one.

Does the calling test also tell me whether I have a schwa or a syllabic l?

Jerry Friedman
And I'm still interested in the definitive ASCII IPA for "Charles" with a standard American accent (assuming there is such a thing).

Why not just use AmE phonemes? /tSArlz/ works for any rhotic AmE accent, would it not?...

I don't think that works for those of us who pronounce it in two syllables. You've got to have an accent mark, haven't you? There may be no standard pronunciation. But I guess that gallery consists of people's own pronunciations (like (bA:nz), which is why I used ('dZE:ri)), so the question will be settled if Charles answers it.

By the way, why doesn't /tSArlz/ work for non-rhotic accents? Non-rhotic speakers realize /r/ before a consonant as (:) or () or something, right?

Jerry Friedman
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Does the calling test also tell me whether I have a schwa or a syllabic l?

I don't believe so.

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