I suspect new words created by upper class activities are labeled "buzzwords" while those coming from less privileged classes are termed "slang". Is this true?
S&
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I suspect new words created by upper class activities are labeled "buzzwords" while those coming from less privileged classes are termed "slang". Is this true? S&

It seems to me that new words created by marketing or sales departments* are labeled "buzzwords" while new words created by *younger people in any economic class are called "slang."
The definition of "younger people" is probably dependent on one's own age. It's true for me, anyway, and that makes a lot of AUEers "younger people."

Maria Conlon
For email: Please don't use "from" address;
instead, use tootsie at sprynet dot com
I suspect new words created by upper class activities are ... less privileged classes are termed "slang". Is this true? S&

It seems to me that new words created by marketing or sales departments are labeled "buzzwords" while new words created ... probably dependent on one's own age. It's true for me, anyway, and that makes a lot of AUEers "younger people."

But where does technical jargon fit into this? Many terms current amongst web posters are new but can they be considered slang?

S&
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I suspect new words created by upper class activities are labeled "buzzwords" while those coming from less privileged classes are termed "slang". Is this true?

It is not. You seem to be confusing nonce words with words that haven't been universally accepted by respected dictionaries as ordinary words. Change the word "created" and the phrase "coming from", and perhaps we can move on to an answer to what I think you meant to say.
Hotmail? What are the whys to using hotmail.com? Don't Internet porno queens and their ilk make use of it?
No porno queens on eircom.net, there aren't.

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs>at>eircom>dot>net
I suspect new words created by upper class activities are ... less privileged classes are termed "slang". Is this true? S&

It seems to me that new words created by marketing or sales departments* are labeled "buzzwords" while new words created by *younger people in any economic class are called "slang."

Not it. Back to the drawing board, with you.
Isn't the hour rather late out there, little cactus flower? Early for me, late for you?

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs>at>eircom>dot>net
I suspect new words created by upper class activities are labeled "buzzwords" while those coming from less privileged classes are termed "slang". Is this true?

It is not. You seem to be confusing nonce words with words that haven't been universally accepted by respected dictionaries ... using hotmail.com? Don't Internet porno queens and their ilk make use of it? No porno queens on eircom.net, there aren't.

I've been using Hotmail for years before the late shitstorm of spam started and I'm more or less free of crap with the filter that comes with it. All my contacts know my address so I am reluctant to change it. I merely wipe out anything obviously not to my taste.. Porno neither offends nor entertains me.
S&
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I suspect new words created by upper class activities are labeled "buzzwords" while those coming from less privileged classes are termed "slang". Is this true?

Agreed, with the additional observation that marketslang/buzzwords are often coined specifically with the intent to confuse, mislead, obfuscate or push emotional buttons, while slang forms naturally as an outgrowth of language usage.

Gary G. Taylor * Rialto, CA
gary at donavan dot org / http:// geetee dot donavan dot org "The two most abundant things in the universe
are hydrogen and stupidity." Harlan Ellison
I suspect new words created by upper class activities are labeled "buzzwords" while those coming from less privileged classes are termed "slang". Is this true?

Agreed, with the additional observation that marketslang/buzzwords are often coined specifically with the intent to confuse, mislead, obfuscate or push emotional buttons, while slang forms naturally as an outgrowth of language usage.

But slang also can be confusing. "Cool" and "sharp" and "crazy" and "out of sight" very largly overlap in their meanings and even "hot" can mean the same as "cool".
S&
Agreed, with the additional observation that marketslang/buzzwords are often coined specifically with the intent to confuse, mislead, obfuscate or push emotional buttons,

Sometimes true, but not for most cases.
while slang forms naturally as an outgrowth of language usage.

For sure, which means you don't agree their origins are found only, or even mainly, in the lower classes.
But slang also can be confusing. "Cool" and "sharp" and "crazy" and "out of sight" very largly overlap in their meanings and even "hot" can mean the same as "cool".

Another problem with your query, in addition to the one I pointed out yesterday, is that buzzwords are not slang words. They are fully accepted words, at least for a time, with no labels attached to them by dictionary editors.

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs>at>eircom>dot>net
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