Hello
I've always understood the expression next Wednesday (or any other day) to mean the next Wednesday that comes along - so if today is Tuesday then "next Wednesday" is tomorrow.
But now I'm wondering if I've been labouring under a misapprehension. A friend told me that next Wednesday is actually shorthand for "Wednesday of next week" and that my usage is more correctly expressed by "this Wednesday" - which is shorthand for Wednesday of this week.

Is there a right and a wrong here? If not, then what is the most common usage - particularly in the UK.
Many Thanks
Jeff
1 2 3 4
Jeff had it:
Hello I've always understood the expression next Wednesday (or any other day) to mean the next Wednesday that comes along ... a right and a wrong here? If not, then what is the most common usage - particularly in the UK.

This is complex and depends on context. If it's Tuesday then "next Wednesday" means 8 days from now. If it's Sunday then it could be either the next Wednesday or the one after that, depending on the hand gestures used. But we'd probably use "this Wednesday" or "a week on Wednesday" to be clear.

David
==
replace usenet with the
Hello I've always understood the expression next Wednesday (or any ... is the most common usage - particularly in the UK.

This is complex and depends on context.

Is it 'complex', or is it 'complicated'?
I think the latter.
Pete
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hello I've always understood the expression next Wednesday (or any ... is the most common usage - particularly in the UK.

This is complex and depends on context. If it's Tuesday then "next Wednesday" means 8 days from now. If it's ... depending on the hand gestures used. But we'd probably use "this Wednesday" or "a week on Wednesday" to be clear.

I agree about Tuesday, but what about Thursday? If I say on Thursday that we will hold the meeting next Wednesday, do I mean in six or thirteen
days? I mean in six days. So I would not say "next Wednesday", I would
say either "Wednesday" or "a week from Wednesday".

GFH
(Email Removed) had it:
I agree about Tuesday, but what about Thursday? If I say on Thursday that we will hold the meeting next ... in six days. So I would not say "next Wednesday", I would say either "Wednesday" or "a week from Wednesday".

Could be either. There is no formal rule about this. It might also be different in different parts of England.

David
==
replace usenet with the
Hello I've always understood the expression next Wednesday (or any other day) to mean the next Wednesday that comes along ... a wrong here? If not, then what is the most common usage - particularly in the UK. Many Thanks Jeff

There's a Public radio show in the US titled "A Way With Words" which discussed this. They concluded that one should stop with words like 'next' and use dates unless the listener and speaker knew how the other understood these words.
I would say "this Wednesday" right until the Monday prior, when it becomes 'tomorrow'. So, "next Wednesday" is a week after "this Wednesday", and "the Wednesday after next" is the week after that. My daughther and I are in sync on this matter, never a misunderstanding. SWMBO just doesn't get it, so we use dates.
JOE
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hello I've always understood the expression next Wednesday (or any other day) to mean the next Wednesday that comes along ... a wrong here? If not, then what is the most common usage - particularly in the UK. Many Thanks Jeff

I looked it up in the Cambridge Online Dictionary:

THIS: "TIME used to refer to the present week, month, year, etc or the one that comes next"
NEXT: "next week/year/Monday, etc the week/year/Monday, etc that follows the present one"
( )
It does look a bit confusing Emotion: smile
I'd say that 'this Wednesday' is the most present Wednesday (since today is actually Tuesday). It's more present than 'next Wednesday', which would be next week (and not this week, because this week is still present).
It does look a bit confusing Emotion: smile I'd say that 'this Wednesday' is the most present Wednesday (since today is actually Tuesday). It's more present than 'next Wednesday', which would be next week (and not this week, because this week is still present).

There's also the expression "Wednesday week" to mean a week on Wednesday. So what does "next Wednesday week" mean?

Les
Hello I've always understood the expression next Wednesday (or any ... common usage - particularly in the UK. Many Thanks Jeff

I looked it up in the Cambridge Online Dictionary: THIS: "TIME used to refer to the present week, month, year, ... more present than 'next Wednesday', which would be next week (and not this week, because this week is still present).

Agreed. "Next Wednesday" is the Wednesday of next week. One could say "the Wednesday of next (or 'the coming') week." Of course, this may still sometimes be ambiguous unless the two people agree when a week begins and ends - is Sunday (as English tradition has it) the first day of a week, or (as almost all diaries and calendars indicate) the last? If Jeff is pinning down an appointment or the like, he would be well advised to give or request the date.
Alan Jones
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more