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Is it true that this has no conditional meaning?

"If she will eat so many chocolates, it's hardly surprising she has a spotty face."
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True.

If X will X means 'as X does X' with a bit more emphasis. As they insist on doing X, then nasty thing Y will happen to them.
Thanks, Nona. Do you use that form?
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Yes, occasionally.

I associate it with my mum telling me off for doing something stupid. There is a heavily exasperated emphasis on the 'will'.
Nona The BritYes, occasionally.

I associate it with my mum telling me off for doing something stupid. There is a heavily exasperated emphasis on the 'will'.

Many Americans I've come across scoff at that form and say that the "will" is redundant, if not grammatically incorrect. As far as I know, it's been around a long time in BE.
There are many meanings of will. I think this is probably the one intended in this use...

used to express frequent, customary, or habitual action or natural tendency or disposition <will get angry over nothing> <will work one day and loaf the next>. When you combine it with 'if' then it almost becomes accusatory.

Just saying 'if you eat chocolate, you will get spots' doesn't have the same meaning at all to me. It is just advice. It is possible that the person you are talking to never eats chocolate anyway. They may or may not have spots. It's just a general statement. If you run in front of cars, one day you will be killed - doesn't mean that the person you are talking to runs in front of cars.

'If you will eat chocolate, you will get spots' shows that the person does have spots and the speaker is blaming their chocolate habit.

If you will run in front of cars, one day you will be killed. This person has a dangerous habit!
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MilkyIs it true that this has no conditional meaning?

"If she will eat so many chocolates, it's hardly surprising she has a spotty face."

I would not myself include it among the traditional "types" (i.e. 0 to 3) of conditional. If we omit "will", the underlying sense seems to be:

1. Accepting the fact that she does X, Y is not surprising.

The "will" seems to inject a greater sense of "insistence" on her part. To judge by other threads I've engaged in, the usage with "will" does seem to be more familiar to BrE speakers.

MrP
To judge by other threads I've engaged in, the usage with "will" does seem to be more familiar to BrE speakers.
I concur. If I were polled about it, I'd say if she will eat so many chocolatessounds 'daft', as you say. Emotion: smile -- although from the discussion I understand what you mean by it -- habit, insistence. I think the American translation is closer to this:

The way she [eats / keeps on eating] chocolate, it's no wonder she's got zits.Emotion: smile

CJ
<The way she [eats / keeps on eating] chocolate>

BrEng also has the possibility to use that. So, we have more possibilities than AmEng, right?

Emotion: wink
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