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“Islam,” wrote Nusseibeh, “was no different for families like ours than I would learn later that Judaism was for Amos Oz a couple of hundred feet away, just beyond No-Man’s-Land.”

Excerpt From
Jerusalem
Simon Sebag Montefiore
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Hi. Can I interpret the underlined sentence as “Islam was as important to families like our as was to Amos Oz ...”?

Thank you.

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zuotengdazuoCan I interpret the underlined sentence as “Islam was as important to families like ours as Judaism was to Amos Oz ...”?

If the context supports this idea, then yes, but without context, all we have is that the relationships were the same (no different). Without supporting evidence, the meaning is

Islam was as important or as unimportant, as interesting or as uninteresting, as inspiring or as uninspiring, ... to our family as Judaism was to Amos Oz.

CJ

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zuotengdazuoIslam was as important to families like our as was Judaism to families like Amos Oz's ..

If the author was referring to the importance of those religions, then yes, you're right.

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Comments  

Thank you both.

And can I paraphrase the underlined sentence as “Islam was to families like ours what Judaism was to Amos Oz ...”? Is this paraphrase more correct?

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zuotengdazuo

And can I paraphrase the underlined sentence as “Islam was to families like ours what Judaism was to Amos Oz ...”? Is this paraphrase more correct?

Yes, that's fine.

CJ