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I've checked the dictionary. It says "no doubt" is adverb. Is that right?

The sentence here: " At this point there's really no doubt that is happens."

In this sentence, "no doubt" is?

Thanks in advance.
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I think you may be misunderstanding what dictionaries tell us about words.

The dictionaries say that 'love' is a noun. They also say that 'love' is a verb. How is that possible?

Here's how. The dictionary is telling us that when 'love' is used as a noun, this is the meaning: (and the meaning for that usage follows). It then tells us that when 'love' is used as a verb, this is the meaning: (and the meaning for that usage follows). The fact that 'love' can be a verb does not at all contradict the fact that 'love' can also be a noun in a different context.

So when the expression 'no doubt' is listed in your dictionary, it says 'adverb', followed by a definition. That definition is what 'no doubt' means when it is used as an adverb. That does not at all contradict the idea that 'doubt' can be used as a noun. Like all nouns, 'doubt' can be preceded by the determiner 'no'.

No doubt you are right.
(no doubt used as an adverb)
There is no doubt that you are right. (no doubt used as determiner and noun)

CJ
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Thank you a lot~

No doubt it helps me a lot ~Emotion: big smile
CalifJimThe dictionary is telling us that when 'love' is used as a noun, this is the meaning: (and the meaning for that usage follows). It then tells us that when 'love' is used as a verb, this is the meaning: (and the meaning for that usage follows). The fact that 'love' can be a verb does not at all contradict the fact that 'love' can also be a noun in a different context.
Well said. I am both impressed by and appreciative of your insight. Thank you!