+0
1: A is no younger than B.

>A is much older than B. It's an emphasis of 'A is not younger than B'

2: A is no more young than B.

>Neither A nor B is young.


It is said that 'no+the comparative of an adjective' and 'no more ' are semantically different from each other, as above. But that seems to be only for short adjectives. I mean, what about long ones, such as 'beautiful'? How do you make such semantic distinction for 'beautiful'? You cannot say 'A is no beautifuler than B', can you?
1 2 3
Comments  
The basic problem is that I see your two sentences as carrying the same meaning ('A and B are the same age, and perhaps neither is particularly young'), Taka, with #1 natural and #2 unnatural.

Could you cite from your reference, or give me some further examples?
Quote from Ask Dr Z
A : He is no more young than her.
B : He is no younger than her.
I cannot understand the difference in meaning.
Eisuke, Japan


Okay, there isn't a difference in meaning, but one is grammatically correct and the other isn't. We do not say 'more young', we say 'younger' .In the same way, we do not say more big (we say bigger), and we do not say beautifuller (we say more beautiful).'He is no younger than her' means 'He isn't younger than her'.

So when do we use more + (adjective) and when do we use adjective + er ? Generally, with short adjectives and adjectives ending in y we add 'er'. Longer adjectives usually need 'more +' .

A state of confusion is normal for humans. I hope it has temporarily been erased. Dr Z.


Some might say "I'm no more young" erratically for "I'm no longer young."
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
It's from 'Current English Usage (Macmillan), 1981 p.171'.
1: A is no younger than B.

>A is much older than B. It's an emphasis of 'A is not younger than B'

2: A is no more young than B.

>Neither A nor B is young.

It is said that 'no+the comparative of an adjective' and 'no more ' are semantically different from each other, as above. But that seems to be only for short adjectives. I mean, what about long ones, such as 'beautiful'? How do you make such semantic distinction for 'beautiful'? You cannot say 'A is no beautifuler than B', can you?

JTT: I'd suggest that Dr Z has missed the point. The meanings are indeed different. The meaning for #2 is different because it addresses a different issue. It isn't a comparison or at least a neutral comparison as much as it's a denial.

A: Joan is quite young.

B: Pshaww! She's no more young than Helen Thomas.

It's stating, in quite a strong manner that Joan is not young.

{Helen Thomas, a Hearst Newspapers columnist, served for fifty-seven years as a correspondent for United Press International and, as White House bureau chief, covered every president since John F. Kennedy.}

Examples from Google:

However, it’s no more shallow than women who only date men who make a certain
amount of money, men who are taller than them,

Results show that ethnic immigrants are no more welcome than asylum seekers.

{ isn't an adjective but the idea of the structure is the same; in this case, it's saying that ethnic immigrants are not welcome.}

When the police patrolled the district, they went in pairs or in even greater
numbers; they were no more welcome than they had been in old Sydney-Town. ...

===

So, to answer Taka's question; the base form of the adjective is used in this type of structure for all forms, whether it takes an 'er' or a 'more'.

Women's bodies are no more beautiful than men's, or cheetahs or dolphins.
All creatures are beautiful. But we humans pay far more attention to women's ...

{I beg to differ with the first part but that's another story}

... and beauty of tree bark, by the fact that the smoothness of a sapling is no
more beautiful than the ridges and folds in the bark of a mature tree. ...

JTT.

So, you mean 'no more [the base form] than' can be used either for an emphasis or a denial?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
This may be a BrE variant; but in the 'denial' context, I find a pull towards:

A is no more young than B is.

Women's bodies are no more beautiful than men's are, or cheetahs' or dolphins'.

MrP
So, you mean 'no more [--er] than' can be used either for an emphasis or an denial?

Hi Taka,

No 'er'. Only the base form is used.

This structure is used as a strong denial, very likely, almost always as a response to some previous statement. The thing that the person is compared to is often times really outlandish because the person is trying to get across the message that this person is NOT at all what they have been stated to be.

Here's an example. Imagine that you think that Mr Koizumi is a terrible Prime Minister.

JTT: Koizumi is a good PM.

JTT: He's no more a PM than a monkey is.

Implication: He's as effective a PM as a monkey is.

It's often used as a way for a person to express a strong dislike for someone. This is often used as emotionally charged language. It isn't really a neutral comparative at all. Note how awful the comparison is in the next fake dialogue:

A: She's beautiful!

B: She's no more beautiful than a piece of dog pooh.

{Will the sanctimonious software censor even 'pooh'?}
Oops! Sorry!! It's a typo.

I meant to say:
you mean 'no more [the base form] than' can be used either for an emphasis or a denial?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more