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Hi, everybody.

What does it mean to say "No flies on you" and when is it appropriate to say it?

Can anyone help? Please?
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It is very informal, so only say it humorously to friends. 'There are no flies on you' means that 'you are very eager to accomplish' whatever task is under discussion, 'you are quick to act' in taking advantage of a situation.

If two young men are sitting in a restaurant, and an attractive young lady enters unattended, one of the two young men might go over and start a casual conversation with her; on his return, his friend might say, 'there's no flies on you, you didn't let the opportunity pass!'

The image of the idiom is an animal which does not allow flying insects to alight on its body, by switching its tail or otherwise remaining very active.
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I wouldn't have dreamed of a more sufficient explanation. Thank you very much.
Hi There

It's used to imply that someone is not 'the sharpest tool in the shed.' It is used sarcastically when someone says something stupid or is a bit slow to catch on...

Hope this helps
Sorry, Anonymous, I disagree completely. Mr. M's explanation is the only one I know of. By remaining active, you don't give the flies a chance to settle down on you. I have NEVER heard it used to imply that someone is stupid.

What do others have to say?
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I agree entirely with Mr. M, too. I heard the idiom sometimes used in the (somewhate simplified) sense of "hyperactive", which is pretty close anyway.

Kajjo
I believe it also used to mean that someone is quick to catch on to something and is not slow on understanding what is going on. I have heard this used in many tv programs when someone is talking and someone else then says this being sarcastic.
AnonymousHi There

It's used to imply that someone is not 'the sharpest tool in the shed.' It is used sarcastically when someone says something stupid or is a bit slow to catch on...

Hope this helps
I've never heard it used like this. Mr. M's answer is correct.
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AnonymousIt's used to imply that someone is not 'the sharpest tool in the shed.' It is used sarcastically when someone says something stupid or is a bit slow to catch on...
I use it to mean exactly the opposite.
I agree with the meanings by Mr M, but I also use it to commend how clever/alert someone is.
For example, somebody tries, unsuccessfully, to pull the wool over a friend's eyes - I would say to my friend - there are no flies on you!
You can also use - there are no flies on me/him/her/us/them
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